Adults2019-12-03T20:56:42+00:00

Resources Library – Prevent Smoking – Adults

Dangers of Tobacco and Vaping Products

5th ANNUAL FORUM on Nicotine Addiction Adapting to Changes in the Approach to Nicotine Addiction

June 3, 2021
8:30 am to 3:30 pm

FREE • OFFERED IN ENGLISH AND FRENCH
VIRTUAL EVENT VIA THE ZOOM PLATFORM
Vitalité Health Network employees may register via iTacit.
Other health professionals can register at education@vitalitenb.ca

The forum is for health professionals and community partners working with patients living with nicotine addiction.
It will allow them to acquire new knowledge and skills to better support those patients.

Main themes: : Evolution of the Ottawa Model for Smoking Cessation, vaping, cytisine, nicotine addiction, reducing to quit, approach to
nicotine addiction in the virtual world, approach to adopt with young people and addiction, option to participate in the OMSC on a voluntary basis, and
the CONNECT project of Vitalité Health Network.

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Announcement: New Website for the Live Well | Bien Vivre Program

A new website for the Live Well | Bien Vivre program has been launched.

LWBV is an evidence-based program using best practices to support client-led health behaviour change. Their professional health coaching is offered in English and French, at no charge, to all New Brunswickers 19 and older.

Website

As pandemic forces change, it’s a good time for Canadians to quit smoking

There’s no shortage of debate on who gets very sick from the virus, and who doesn’t. It is clear that we must do a better job of protecting vulnerable groups: the elderly, the immunocompromised, the poor and the racialized. Yet, data shows that regardless of age or socioeconomic status, those who smoke cigarettes are at higher risk of becoming critically ill when compared to non-smokers. In fact, according to a recent study, smokers are 1.45 times more likely to develop serious complications from COVID-19.

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Break It Off launched a new advertising campaign!

Young adult smoking cessation campaign

Break It Off, a collaborative campaign by Health Canada and the Canadian Cancer Society, helps young adults aged 20-24 quit smoking and stay smoke-free. We are excited to share our new advertising campaign materials with our partners in smoking cessation. Until March 31st, the advertisements relay 2 core messages and drive young adults to the Break It Off website, where they can find tips and tools to help them quit smoking. Advertisements include:

  1. A 15-second video and social media ad on Twitch, Instagram and Facebook encourages young adults to consider the financial benefits of quitting.
  2. Banner ads and social media ads on Facebook educate and remind young adults that quit methods are effective.

How you can help – Spread the word

 

We’ve posted our ads to our Break It Off social media channels.  Help us boost our reach by liking and sharing these posts to your social media channels:

Social Ad, Video: How much can you save if you quit smoking?

 

Social Ad: Combining methods increases your chances of quitting smoking.

Doctors seek Federal Court Order to Force Health Canada to complete its overdue review of the Tobacco and Vaping Products Act

PRESS RELEASE – November 14, 2022

Doctors seek Federal Court Order to Force Health Canada to Comply with Tobacco Law

Mandatory Report More Than Five Months Overdue

(Ottawa – November 14, 2022) Today a national health charity applied for a Federal Court order directing Health Canada to complete its overdue review of the Tobacco and Vaping Products Act and to present the results to Parliament.

“The law is crystal clear” said Dr. Atul Kapur, president of Physicians for a Smoke-Free Canada (PSC). “Section 60 of the Tobacco and Vaping Products Act says the Minister ‘must’ conduct a review of the provisions and operations of the law every two years, beginning in May 2021 and ‘must’ present each of these reports to Parliament within 12 months.”

“It is now more than five months past the deadline set by the law for the first report to be made public. It is increasingly apparent that without direction from the Court, the government will continue to disregard its responsibility to disclose the results of its policy choices on the tobacco and nicotine market.”

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Federal Health Ministers refer to vaping liquids for message on National Poison Prevention Week

Message from the Minister of Health and the Minister of Mental Health and Addictions and Associate Minister of Health on National Poison Prevention Week – March 20 to 26, 2022

From: Health Canada

Statement

March 23, 2022 | Ottawa, ON | Health Canada

This National Poison Prevention Week, we would like to remind Canadians that many items found in our homes can be poisonous, causing serious harm if not used, stored, or disposed of correctly. With this year’s theme – Make your plan – in mind, Health Canada is encouraging Canadians to keep their loved ones safe by understanding what products are poisonous and checking that they are safely stored in their home.

An estimated 90 percent of unintentional, preventable poisonings take place at home. Young children and persons with cognitive impairment are at the greatest risk of unintentional poisonings. The health effects of poisonings can vary widely, from temporary injury to death, and depend on which substances the individual is exposed to, the amount, and the type of contact.

Three of the most commonly reported sources of unintentional poisonings are household cleaning products such as detergent packets, cannabis, and vaping liquids containing nicotine.

  • Cleaning products: Commonly used cleaning products, like laundry and dishwasher detergent packets, can be poisonous. These small, brightly coloured packets have been mistaken for candy and swallowed, causing serious injuries. To prevent poisonings, such products should be kept in their original child-resistant containers and stored out of sight and reach.
  • Cannabis: Ingesting cannabis is the most common cause of cannabis poisoning in children. Results from the 2021 Canadian Cannabis Survey showed that 36% of Canadians who had cannabis inside their home stored it in unlocked cabinets or drawers, and 17% of Canadians stored it on open shelves or tables. Remember that illegal cannabis edible products are often packaged to look like popular food products, and can easily be mistaken for candy or other foods that appeal to kids. Only buy legal cannabis from licensed retailers and store it out of reach in its original child-resistant packaging.
  • Vaping liquid: Vaping liquid containing nicotine is poisonous, particularly to young children. Even in small amounts, it can be very harmful if swallowed or absorbed through the skin. When buying a container of vaping liquid with nicotine, look for one that has a child-resistant closure and a toxic hazard symbol with the warning ‘POISON’, both of which are required by law.

Safe storage of household chemicals, cannabis, and vaping liquid is key to reducing the likelihood of poisonings in your home.

Poisonings can happen quickly. Knowing what your next step is can save lives. If you suspect that you or someone around you may have been poisoned, call a poison centre or 911 right away.

We want to thank all Canadians for helping to make the environments where our families live, learn, and play as safe as possible.

Find more information about safely buying, using, storing and disposing of drugshealth products and household chemical products on the Health Canada website.

The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, P.C., M.P.
The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, P.C., M.P.

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Health Canada announces funding for a tobacco cessation project to mark World No Tobacco Day 2021

News release

May 31, 2021   | Ottawa, Ontario   | Health Canada

Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of premature death and disease in Canada. It can harm nearly every organ in the body and plays a role in causing over 40 diseases and other serious health outcomes, from lung cancer to emphysema to heart disease.

Today, to mark World No Tobacco Day, the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Health, announced $3 million in funding for a national social marketing campaign to encourage people who smoke to quit. This campaign will be a collaborative effort between the Canadian Cancer Society, the Canadian Lung Association, the Canadian Public Health Association, and the Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada. Funding for this project was provided under Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program. The investment aligns with the objectives of Canada’s Tobacco Strategy, which aims to reduce tobacco use to less than 5% by 2035.

The Government of Canada is committed to working in partnership with organizations across the country to maximize the reach of public education efforts around the health risks associated with tobacco products, and to protect Canadians – particularly youth, non-users of tobacco products and young children – from the harms of smoking and nicotine addiction.

Quitting smoking can be difficult, but it is possible. Canadians who want to quit smoking do not have to do it alone. Services and supports are available to help Canadians quit smoking. Trained specialists with the pan-Canadian toll-free quit line can help individuals develop a quit-smoking plan, answer questions and provide referrals to programs and services in communities across Canada, including information on how to access quit-smoking medications that can help with the potential withdrawal symptoms. Canadians can reach a quit coach at 1-866-366-3667 or online, or can talk to their health care professional for assistance.

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Information on federal budget taxation of tobacco and vaping products

Regarding the federal tobacco tax increase and new e-cigarette tax in the federal budget on Monday April 19, 2021, excerpts from the budget documents  are copied below.

Budget 2021

(excerpt)

Taxation of Vaping Products

Young Canadians’ use of vaping products, such as e-cigarettes, is on the rise. One Health Canada survey indicates that, since 2018, use has doubled among Canadian high school students. Vaping with nicotine poses risks, especially to young people: nicotine is highly addictive, can affect memory and concentration, and is known to alter brain development in teens. In addition to raising revenues, vaping taxation could become an effective means to help curtail harmful consumption of these products. Budget 2021 announces the government’s intention to introduce a new taxation framework for the imposition of excise duties on vaping products in 2022. The Government of Canada will also work with any provinces and territories that may be interested in a federally coordinated approach to taxing these products.

Taxation of Tobacco

Tobacco use continues to be the leading preventable cause of premature death in Canada. Tobacco taxation is an effective way to reduce tobacco consumption and help reach the government’s goal of less than 5 per cent of the population using tobacco by 2035. Budget 2021 proposes to increase the tobacco excise duty by $4 per carton of 200 cigarettes, along with corresponding increases to the excise duty rates for other tobacco products. This measure would take effect the day after Budget Day. It is estimated that this measure will increase federal revenues by $2.1 billion over five years starting in 2021-22.

Excise Duty on Tobacco and Vaping
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NBATC Announcement

The New Brunswick Medical Society has committed $20,000 to our mission to work collaboratively with stakeholders to build supportive environments for tobacco and smoke-free living in New Brunswick. We greatly appreciate this support that will serve to help reduce tobacco and vaping use through the creation of innovative initiatives that make a significant impact on the health of New Brunswickers.

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New Brunswick – CCS calls for action on youth vaping during provincial election campaign

Canadian Cancer Society calls for all political parties to commit to youth vaping legislation in platforms

New Brunswick lags far behind other Maritime Provinces in curbing youth vaping

August 31, 2020 (Saint John, New Brunswick): The Canadian Cancer Society is calling on all political parties to adopt meaningful and actionable platform commitments to address significant gaps in cancer prevention and support for those living with cancer and have identified two key issues.  The first priority is an essential component of combating the current youth vaping culture in New Brunswick as outlined in this video (see here), with a clear message: governments need to do more to address youth vaping and increasing the minimum age to 21 is a strong start. “Vaping rates in New Brunswick are reaching epidemic levels. We need government to take strong immediate action by passing a suite of comprehensive measures designed to reduce vaping rates amongst youth,” says Lana Randell, Advocacy Coordinator.

During the 2020 New Brunswick Provincial Election, we continue to encourage the government and all Members of Legislative Assembly to highlight the ongoing tobacco epidemic and create effective policies that will promote healthier lifestyles, protect the next generation of Canadians and enhance the quality of life of people living with cancer.

Effective action on vaping must include key policy measures, such as raising the minimum age for e-cigarettes and tobacco to 21, restricting e-cigarette sales to adult-only locations, and removing flavours from e-cigarettes, taxation, amongst others.  Earlier this year, Prince Edward Island adopted legislation to increase the minimum smoking and vaping age to 21 and restrict sales of e-cigarettes to adult-only locations and just announced regulations to eliminate the sale of flavoured e-cigarettes.  Nova Scotia recently implemented regulations to eliminate the sale of flavoured e-cigarettes, cap nicotine levels at 20mg/ml, and a taxation structure on e-cigarette products and e-juice.

A 2019 study, led by Professor David Hammond of the University of Waterloo, found that among those 16-19 years old, vaping increased by a stunning 112% from 2017 to 2019, from 8.4% to 17.8%. “The e-cigarette industry has designed a persuasive and enticing market for youth, and the growing use and popularity of vaping products is a direct threat to the progress made in tobacco control,” says Randell.  “Governments have an opportunity to stem the tide of this growing crisis, and we urge them to act swiftly and decisively.”

Tobacco is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in Canada, which is why CCS urges the provincial government to adopt a minimum age of 21. The vast majority of smokers begin smoking before the age of 19 and many of them get and stay addicted. A recent report by the Institute of Medicine concluded that increasing the minimum tobacco sales age to 21 in the U.S. would reduce smoking rates among 15- to 17-year-olds by 25%, and among 18 and 19-year-olds by 15%.  (Video)

The Canadian Cancer Society has identified a second key priority with the need to expedite the implementation of the already approved and funded Palliative Care Strategy to improve access to palliative care for the people of New Brunswick, with cancer patients comprising approximately 80% of patients who receive palliative care.

About the Canadian Cancer Society

The Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) is the only national charity that supports Canadians with all cancers in communities across the country. No other organization does what we do; we are the voice for Canadians who care about cancer. We fund groundbreaking research, provide a support system for all those affected by cancer and shape health policies to prevent cancer and support those living with the disease.

Help us make a difference. Call 1-888-939-3333 or visit cancer.ca today.

For more information, please contact:

Lana Randell
Canadian Cancer Society
506.634.6276

New Federal Regulations on E-cigarette Advertising

The Government of Canada is taking a number of steps to address the rise in youth vaping. Among these measures, the final Vaping Products Promotion Regulations (VPPR) were published in the Canada Gazette, Part II , July 8, 2020. These new regulations will restrict vaping product promotions aimed at youth to address a key factor that has contributed to the rise in youth vaping.

Please see the Minister of Health’s announcement related to the new regulations at the following link https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2020/07/health-canada-confirms-ban-of-advertising-for-vaping-products-wherever-they-can-be-seen-or-heard-by-youth.html

The VPPR will:

  • prohibit vaping products from being advertised in public spaces if the ads can be seen or heard by youth, whether in brick and mortar stores or online, including on radio and television;
  • prohibit retailers from displaying vaping products at points of sale in a manner that they may be seen by youth, including online; and
  • require that permitted ads (e.g., displayed where youth are not permitted) convey a prescribed health warning statement about the hazards of vaping product use.

The final regulations as well as the associated Regulatory Impact Assessment Statement were published in the Canada Gazette, Part II today, July 8, 2020, and can be found at the following link: http://gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2020/2020-07-08/html/sor-dors143-eng.html

The regulations come into force 30 days after publication on August 7, 2020, with the exception of the point-of-sale display prohibition, which will come into force 60 days after publication on September 6, 2020.  The List of Health Warnings for Vaping Product Advertising can be found here: https://canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/smoking-tobacco/vaping/product-safety-regulation/list-health-warnings-vaping-product-advertising.html

Science has marched on: it’s time to update the advice to Canadians

Since 2018, other governments have assigned committees of scientists to conduct reviews of the growing body of evidence. From these, a scientific consensus is emerging that vaping is dangerous and not especially useful as a smoking cessation method. While no single authoritative document has brought together these systematic reviews, meta-analyses and report of health authorities, it is now apparent that:

1. E-cigarettes have increased the number of young nicotine users in some countries.
2. Young people who use e-cigarettes are more likely to smoke conventional cigarettes.
3. Dual use is common and harmful.
4. When purchased as consumer products, e-cigarettes are not effective cessation aids.
5. E-cigarettes cause damage to respiratory and circulatory systems.
6. Other governments have provided more recent scientific assessments.
7. Health Canada’s messaging on e-cigarettes is out-dated.
Full Report
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Smoking and Tobacco – New Brunswick Lung Association

Useful information compiled by the New Brunswick Lung Association related to the health effects of smoking, tobacco, cannabis, and vaping, as well as on how to quit smoking.

Website

Smoking history tied to worse COVID-19 outcomes

Cumulative cigarette smoke exposure is an independent risk factor for hospital admission and death from COVID-19, according to a research letter published online Jan. 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Smoking, Vaping and Tobacco – Health Canada

Learn about vaping, tobacco products, effects of smoking, second-hand smoke, prevention and quitting.

Website

Statement of Chief Public Health Officer of Canada on COVID-19 and smoking

Below is a Statement from Dr. Theresa Tam, the Chief Public Health Officer of Canada on COVID-19 and smoking.  The Statement was issued on May 31, 2020, World No Tobacco Day.  The statement says in part:

“While we continue to learn more about the virus everyday, preliminary scientific evidence suggests a history of smoking may substantially increase the chance of adverse health outcomes for COVID-19 patients. Having an underlying health condition, such as one caused by smoking, also puts you at risk for more serious illness and even death.”

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The New Brunswick Lung Association’s 27th Annual Respiratory Symposium/Webinar Sept. 25th, 2020

The New Brunswick Lung Association invites health-care professionals interested in lung health and air quality to the “The New Brunswick Lung Association’s 27th Annual Respiratory Health Symposium on September 25th, 2020, 8:30 am – 10:30 am. The event this year is in the form of a two hour webinar. There is no registration fee. Once registered you will get a link to the event.

Click the link below to register for this year’s Respiratory Health Symposium, and follow this link to see the 2020 Respiratory Health Symposium Agenda.

Registration

Tobacco-Free Living – New Brunswick Department of Social Development – Wellness Branch

Tobacco free living is essential to a healthy lifestyle! Living tobacco free means avoiding exposure to smoke, not starting to smoke and, if you currently smoke, quitting. Living tobacco free reduces the risk of many chronic diseases and enhances quality of life. Information and links to resources for New Brunswickers who want to live tobacco-free, including quitting smoking, avoiding exposure to second-hand smoke and smoking prevention for children, are provided on this web site.

Website

Tobacco-Free Living – Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health (Public Health) – Government of New Brunswick

The Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health promotes tobacco-free living by administering legislation that supports smoke-free public places and restricts both tobacco advertising and sales to youth. The goal is to create environments that will discourage people, especially children from ever starting to use tobacco. Tobacco-free living at home, work and play is important to the health of all New Brunswickers. The Department of Health works closely with the Department of Social Development and other partner organizations to support tobacco-free living initiatives. Information and tools related to the New Brunswick Smoke-Free Spaces Act as well as the New Brunswick Tobacco and Electronic Cigarette Sales Act are available on this webpage.

Website

Webinars – Ontario Tobacco Research Unit

Listen to recently recorded Ontario Tobacco Research Unit (OTRU) webinars on a variety of topics.

Website

WHO – Tobacco responsible for 20% of deaths from coronary heart disease worldwide

Every year, 1.9 million people die from tobacco-induced heart disease, according to a new brief released today by the World Health Organization, World Heart Federation and the University of Newcastle Australia ahead of World Heart Day, marked on 29 September.

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This was released in advance of World Heart Day, on Sept. 29.

What is World Heart Day?

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Tobacco and Cancer

Announcement: New Website for the Live Well | Bien Vivre Program

A new website for the Live Well | Bien Vivre program has been launched.

LWBV is an evidence-based program using best practices to support client-led health behaviour change. Their professional health coaching is offered in English and French, at no charge, to all New Brunswickers 19 and older.

Website

Canadian Cancer Statistics Publication – Canadian Cancer Society – 2019

This publication provides health professionals, researchers, policy-makers and the general public with detailed information about the burden of cancer in Canada. It is developed by the Canadian Cancer Statistics Advisory Committee through a partnership between the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada in collaboration with the provincial and territorial cancer registries.

Website
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Cancer in New Brunswick 2014-2018 Report

New Brunswick Cancer Network (NBCN)
July 2022

Report Highlights

The New Brunswick Cancer Network is pleased to release the Cancer in New Brunswick 2014-2018
report:
• The Cancer in New Brunswick 2014-2018 (the Report) is the fifth cancer report released in New
Brunswick.
• The purpose of the Report is to provide updated information about the burden of cancer in NB.
This information is important for stakeholders (public, health care providers and government) to
inform decisions on allocation of health care resources and plan for future programs and services
necessary to meet the needs of New Brunswickers.
• This Report expands cancer statistics of four leading cancers (prostate, breast, lung and
colorectal) from seven health regions to fifteen census divisions by using Geographic Information
System (GIS) to better monitor cancer burden in New Brunswick.
• The section Special Topic analyzes the first-hand experiences of NB cancer survivors who
participated in the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer’s Transition Study and provides rich
information to guide the development of services aimed to enhance supportive care for people
living with and beyond cancer diagnosis.
• About 4,947 new cancer cases and 2,007 deaths from cancer occurred yearly in NB between 2014
and 2018.
• More men (52%) than women (48%) were diagnosed with cancer.
• Top 4 cancers (prostate, breast, lung and colorectal) accounted for the majority (53%) of newly
diagnosed cancers in both sexes.
• Mortality rates improved for stomach, lung, prostate and Hodgkin’s and Non-Hodgkin’s
lymphoma in men and breast, cervical and leukemia in women.
• The 5-year relative survival ratio of all cancers for men was around 60% and 64% for women.
• As of January 1, 2018, there were 21,915 individuals living in New Brunswick who had been
diagnosed with cancer in the previous ten years. Cases diagnosed in the previous ten years
represent the major demand for health care services.
Cancer in New Brunswick 2014-2018 2
• If the past and current cancer incidence trends continue, the number of new cancer cases is
expected to be about 7,000 annually between 2028 and 2032 in New Brunswick, which represents
a 38.2% increase from the 2018 actual counts.
• The data source for this report is the NB Provincial Cancer Registry that has collected
information on cancer in NB since 1950’s. It is the crucial source of information for cancer
control efforts in the province.
• The Report will be available online at the Department of Health website:

CancerInNewBrunswick2014-2018.pdf (gnb.ca)

Top 4 cancers in NB (Prostate, Breast, Lung and Colorectal)

Prostate cancer
• Prostate cancer (21% of all cancers) was the most commonly diagnosed cancer among NB men.
• In 2018, 572 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer and 113 died from the disease.
• The 5-year relative survival ratio for prostate cancer was 95%.
Breast cancer
• Breast cancer (27% of all cancers) was the most commonly diagnosed cancer among NB women.
• In 2018, 644 women were diagnosed with breast cancer and 135 died from it.
• The 5-year relative survival ratio for female breast cancer was 89%.
Lung cancer
• Between 2014 and 2018, lung cancer was the leading cause of cancer death and took more lives
than prostate, breast and colorectal cancers combined (2,817 vs. 2,285). Approximately 1 out of 4
cancer deaths in men and 1 out of 4 in women was due to lung cancer.
• In 2018, lung cancer remained the leading cause of cancer death for both men (310) and women
(248).
• The 5-year relative survival ratio for lung cancer was 18% for men and 26% for women.
Colorectal cancer
• In 2018, 628 New Brunswickers were diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 235 died from it.
• The 5-year relative survival ratio for colorectal cancer was 66% for men and 64% for women.

Full Report
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It’s My Life – Stop Cancer Before It Starts! – Canadian Cancer Society

Discover how 16 factors affect your cancer risk and how you can take action with our interactive tool – It’s My Life!

Website

Live Smoke-Free -Canadian Cancer Society

Did you know that smoking is responsible for an estimated 30% of all cancer deaths in Canada? It also causes about 85% of lung cancer cases. The facts are clear. The more you smoke and the longer you smoke, the more you increase your risk of developing lung and other cancers. In fact, any smoking at all may cause lung damage. But that doesn’t mean it’s too late to quit! No matter how old you are or how long you’ve been smoking, you can reduce your risk of cancer by quitting.

Infographics, videos, games and visual aids help to educate on smoking as a risk factor for cancer on the Canadian Cancer Society website.

Website

Tobacco and Heart and Lung Health

Announcement: New Website for the Live Well | Bien Vivre Program

A new website for the Live Well | Bien Vivre program has been launched.

LWBV is an evidence-based program using best practices to support client-led health behaviour change. Their professional health coaching is offered in English and French, at no charge, to all New Brunswickers 19 and older.

Website

Government of Canada proposes to print health warnings on individual cigarettes

News release

Proposed measures seek to strengthen regulations for tobacco product packaging and labelling

June 10, 2022 | Ottawa, ON | Health Canada

Despite decades of efforts, tobacco use continues to be the leading preventable cause of illness and premature death in Canada, killing approximately 48,000 Canadians each year. While novel and provocative when introduced more than a decade ago, the current warnings on tobacco products have become stale for the 13% of people in Canada who smoke and come across them regularly.

Recognizing that more needs to be done to protect the health of people in Canada and ensure people stay informed about the health risks of tobacco use, the Government of Canada is proposing to update the health-related messages and images printed on packages of cigarettes and other tobacco products.

Today, the Honourable Carolyn Bennett, Minister for Mental Health and Addictions and Associate Minister of Health, announced the launch of a 75-day public consultation period beginning on June 11 to seek feedback from people in Canada that will inform the development of new proposed tobacco labelling regulations.

A key feature of the proposed regulations is the introduction of written health warnings printed on individual cigarettes, cigars that have a filter, and cigarette tubes.

This new packaging would help to ensure that health-related messages reach people who often access cigarettes one at a time in social situations, particularly youth and young adults. Labelling the tipping paper of cigarettes and other tobacco products would make it virtually impossible to avoid health warnings altogether. If implemented, Canada would be the first country in the world to introduce such a requirement.

The proposed regulations would also build on existing requirements by updating current health-related messages, extending messaging requirements to all tobacco product packages and implementing periodic rotation of messages among other measures. These messages would include an extended list of health hazards and negative health effects to be featured on tobacco product health warnings and health information messages, including stomach cancer, colorectal cancer, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, and cervical cancer.

In addition, the proposed regulations would support Canada’s Tobacco Strategy by preventing long-term dependence on tobacco, reducing tobacco-related death and disease, and reducing the burden on Canada’s health care system and society.

The proposed regulations can be found in the Canada Gazette, Part I. To participate in the consultation, interested parties can submit their comments via email to pregs@hc-sc.gc.ca until August 25th. Feedback from the consultation will inform the development of the final Regulations.

Quotes

“Reducing the devastating harms of tobacco use remains a top priority for health and health care in Canada. To better inform Canadians about the effects of smoking on their health and on the health of those around them, our government is proposing to strengthen regulations that would introduce new warnings of health hazards and negative health effects on tobacco products. If implemented, they would prevent the preventable as they better communicate the health risks of smoking to millions of people across the country each day, helping more Canadians live healthier, happier, and tobacco-free lives.”

The Honourable Carolyn Bennett
Minister of Mental Health and Addictions and Associate Minister of Health

“As a government, we are committed to use every tool at our disposal — including tobacco packaging and labelling — to help protect the health of all Canadians, especially young people and non-smokers. Through Canada’s Tobacco Strategy we are working to reduce tobacco use from 13% to less than 5% by 2035, which is a commitment we keep making strides towards. Making sure that everyone across the country can receive credible information on the risks of tobacco use so they can make healthier choices is crucial for the wellbeing of everyone.”

The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos
Minister of Health

“As a world leader in smoking cessation and the home of the Ottawa Model for Smoking Cessation, the University of Ottawa Heart Institute welcomes any initiative to reduce the consumption of tobacco and tobacco-derived products to prevent heart attacks and save thousands of lives in Canada.”

Dr. Thierry Mesana
President and CEO, University of Ottawa Heart Institute

“The proposed regulations are an essential, effective measure to reduce tobacco use and are internationally groundbreaking in several respects, including with some world precedent setting provisions. Canada already has the world’s best tobacco plain packaging regulations. With the proposed regulations, Canada would also have the world’s best overall tobacco health warning system, including enhanced messages on the package exterior, messages inside the package that are internationally unique, and health messages on the cigarette itself, a world first.”

Rob Cunningham
Senior Policy Analyst, Canadian Cancer Society

“Heart & Stroke applauds the federal government’s proposal to strengthen health warnings for tobacco packaging including the bold measure of adding warnings on cigarettes themselves. Messages that clearly and directly highlight the dangers associated with these products will reduce their appeal to youth as well as support current smokers in their efforts to quit smoking.”

Doug Roth
CEO, Heart & Stroke

“We were extremely pleased to see the announcement made by Minister Bennett on measures to strengthen tobacco product labeling. Included today was a proposal to have warnings directly on cigarettes, which is a bold and impactful strategy, one that will continue Canada’s trend of being a leader in tobacco control. This will ensure that the message of how dangerous these products are to the lung health of Canadians cannot be missed.”

Terry Dean
President and CEO, Canadian Lung Association

“These proposed new warnings are an important advance in public health protection. They provide another welcome example of Canadian innovation in tobacco regulation.”

Cynthia Callard
Executive Director, Physicians for a Smoke-Free Canada

“The health warning messages and images are not only seen by smokers themselves but also by those close to them, including children. With more than a billion warnings circulating in Canada each year, they are far-reaching and contribute massively to public education efforts regarding the risks of smoking, in addition to being cost-free.”

Flory Doucas
Co-Director and spokesperson for the Coalition québécoise pour le contrôle du tabac

Quick facts

  • Over the past few decades, tobacco use prevalence has fallen from 28% in 1998 to 13% today.
  • Canada first adopted pictorial warning requirements for tobacco product packages in 2000 to increase awareness of the health hazards and health effects associated with tobacco use. The labels featured on tobacco product packages combine strong images with messages that are noticeable, informative and credible.
  • Current health-related messages and images for cigarettes and little cigars have been in place since 2011. Those for most remaining tobacco products have remained unchanged since their introduction in 2000.
  • The proposed regulations would build on the achievements of the current tobacco product labelling requirements. They would also consolidate all tobacco product labelling and packaging requirements in a single set of regulations: the Tobacco Products Packaging and Labelling Regulations.
  • The proposed regulations would support the objectives of the Tobacco and Vaping Products Act, in particular to enhance public awareness about the health hazards of tobacco use. They would also support Canada’s Tobacco Strategy and its target of reaching less than 5% tobacco use by 2035.
  • The proposed regulations would bring Canada into full compliance with its tobacco labelling obligations under Article 11 of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control by extending health warning and toxicity information requirements to all tobacco product packages.
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Heart failure in Canada: complex, incurable and on the rise

Heart & Stroke News Release

Heart failure in Canada: complex, incurable and on the rise
A national action plan will increase access to diagnosis, care and support

February 1, 2022 – Heart failure is a serious and growing problem in Canada, putting a significant strain on
people living with the condition, their families and healthcare systems according to a new Heart & Stroke
report. Falling short: How Canada is failing people with heart failure and how we can change that reveals
that despite progress, navigating through siloed systems remains difficult and significant gaps still exist in
diagnosis, treatment and support.
In Canada there are 750,000 people living with heart failure and 100,000 people are diagnosed with this
incurable condition each year. According to a new Heart & Stroke poll* heart failure touches one in three
Canadians, either because they have it themselves or because it affects a family member or close friend.
“Heart failure is an epidemic. It’s one of the fastest growing cardiovascular conditions in the world,” says Dr.
Anique Ducharme, President of the Canadian Heart Failure Society, a professor of medicine at Université de
Montréal and a cardiologist at the Montreal Heart Institute.
Anything that damages the heart can lead to heart failure. Experts expect heart failure will continue to rise
due to the aging population and an increase in younger people being diagnosed due to better detection tools
and increased risk factors. As well, the COVID-19 virus can cause heart damage which can lead to heart
failure, and the pandemic disrupted healthcare services resulting in people with existing heart conditions not
accessing care and ending up sicker.

Heart failure costs everyone
Heart failure is a chronic condition caused by the heart not functioning as it should or by a problem with its
structure. It can happen if the heart is too weak or too stiff, or both. This often results in fatigue and
shortness of breath, and those living with the condition often experience depression and anxiety and reduced
quality of life. The toll can also be substantial on family and other caregivers who manage medications,
medical appointments and frequent trips to the emergency department.
“It is absolutely a full-time job,” says Heather Lannon, who cared for her husband, Jamie, for nine years after
his heart failure diagnosis.
Heart failure is one of the top reasons why people in Canada are hospitalized. In fact, it is often referred to
as a ‘revolving door’ condition because one in five heart failure patients will be readmitted to hospital within a
month of being discharged. By 2030, the healthcare costs associated with heart failure in Canada are
expected to reach $2.8 billion per year.

Complex, chronic, incurable – and misunderstood
Most people with heart failure have at least one other significant cardiovascular condition – and often up to
seven (for example diabetes, hypertension, atrial fibrillation), complicating treatment and impacting quality of
life. Nearly half of patients with heart failure will die within five years of being diagnosed.
According to the Heart & Stroke poll Canadians do not understand the condition or the urgency:
• Four in 10 Canadians do not understand what heart failure is.
• One in three Canadians do not know that heart failure is on the rise.
• Two in three Canadians do not know there is no cure for heart failure.

Fighting on all fronts to beat heart failure
Early diagnosis, lifestyle changes, access to medication, medical devices like pacemakers, artificial heart
valves or pumps, and community support can improve health outcomes and quality of life.
“I thought I was invincible. Heart failure brought me to my knees,” says Kevin Lobo, who was an athletic 38-
year-old when he was diagnosed with heart failure. A life-saving stent and medications, and eventually openheart surgery helped him manage his condition. He remains upbeat and determined to live a full life. “I still
drive. I still go to the gym. I still play golf. I do everything.”
Unfortunately, different circumstances can impact the treatment and support people with heart failure receive
including ethnicity, income, gender, and location.

According to a Heart & Stroke Heart Failure Resources and Services Inventory** there is room for significant
improvement in many areas of heart failure care across the country. For example, 27% of hospitals do not
have access to one of the procedures that is essential for diagnosing heart failure (natriuretic peptide testing)
and 16% of hospitals do not follow published heart failure care guidelines.
“There has been some progress to improve outcomes and quality of life for people living with heart failure,
informed by important research. But much more could — and should — be done, especially as heart failure
numbers continue to grow,” says Dr. Patrice Lindsay, Director, Health Systems, Heart & Stroke. “That’s why
Heart & Stroke brought together leading cardiac organizations and others from across the country to drive an
action plan, informed by nurses, cardiologists, pharmacists and people living with heart failure and their
caregivers.”
The action plan emphasizes an integrated approach to heart failure across Canada, including:
• Integrated systems of care
• Evidence-based care driven by high quality research
• Access to specialized care
• Coordinated and seamless transitions of care
• Support for people living with heart failure and their families and caregivers.
Other areas that will improve outcomes and quality of life for people living with heart failure include improved
access to necessary medications through a national, universal pharmacare program and expanded access
to virtual care.
*The national, bilingual online poll was conducted by Environics Research Group, with 2,257 Canadian residents 18 years and older,
Nov. 8-13 2021.
** The Heart & Stroke Heart Failure Resources and Services Inventory was conducted throughout 2021 and the interim data provided in
this report includes responses from 405 of the 654 acute healthcare facilities in Canada completed as of Nov. 18, 2021. Some values
may have minor changes once full data collection is complete.
About Heart & Stroke
Life. We don’t want you to miss it. That’s why Heart & Stroke leads the fight to beat heart disease and stroke.
We must generate the next medical breakthroughs, so Canadians don’t miss out on precious moments.
Together, we are working to prevent disease, save lives and promote recovery through research, health
promotion and public policy. Heartandstroke.ca @HeartandStroke

Full report
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Know the Risks for Heart Disease and Stroke, by Community – New Brunswick Health Council – 2018

Prevention is the key to reducing heart disease and stroke, and it starts with knowing the risks. The following indicators are all linked to heart disease. For each of the province’s 33 communities, we looked at how many of these indicators are worse than average.

  • Hypertension
  • Diabetes
  • Blood pressure checks
  • Cholesterol checks
  • Obesity rates
  • Smoking
  • Eating fruit and vegetables
  • Physical activity
  • Heavy drinking
  • Living in low-income households
  • No high school diploma
  • Discussing health improvement with health professionals
Website
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Podcast: “Tobacco and Heart Health” – NBATC, Heart & Stroke Foundation NB and HEPAC – 2018

The NBATC and the Heart & Stroke Foundation of NB talk about the effects of tobacco on your heart’s health as well as what you can do to promote tobacco-free living in New Brunswick during this Healthy Eating and Physical Coalition (HEPAC) special Q&A podcast commemorating World No Tobacco Day 2018.

Listen to the podcast
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Tobacco and Heart Health – New Brunswick Anti-Tobacco Coalition – 2017

Fact sheet addressing the effects of tobacco, the advantages of quitting smoking and how tobacco-free environments help protect everyone’s heart health.

PDF
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WHO – Tobacco responsible for 20% of deaths from coronary heart disease worldwide

Every year, 1.9 million people die from tobacco-induced heart disease, according to a new brief released today by the World Health Organization, World Heart Federation and the University of Newcastle Australia ahead of World Heart Day, marked on 29 September.

More Information

This was released in advance of World Heart Day, on Sept. 29.

What is World Heart Day?

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World Heart Day is celebrated every year on 29 September

Created by the World Heart Federation, World Heart Day informs people around the globe that CVD, including heart disease and stroke, is the world’s leading cause of death claiming 17.9 million lives each year, and highlights the actions that individuals can take to prevent and control CVD. It aims to drive action to educate people that by controlling risk factors such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity, at least 80% of premature deaths from heart disease and stroke could be avoided.

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World Restart a Heart Day

o  We know that the vast majority of cardiac arrests occur outside the hospital.

o  We know that most people experiencing a cardiac arrest in this situation don’t survive.

o  We know that the quick response of bystanders increases the chance for survival.

On October 16, the fourth annual World Restart a Heart (WRAH) day, we invite you to participate in this global campaign to increase public awareness on cardiac arrest and on the importance of learning basic CPR skills and how to use an AED.

Join Heart & Stroke and our international partners by sharing an important message through social media: Everyone can learn basic CPR and how to use an AED.

Each year the theme of World Restart a Heart changes: this year’s theme is about survivors. If it’s possible to share a story or two of survivors who are still with us today thanks to bystander CPR, please use the hashtag #CPRSavedMyLife.

But our collective goal for the day never wavers: to increase bystander CPR to ultimately improve the survival rates of cardiac arrest to help save more lives.

We’ve prepared a social media kit for you that includes posts that you can use as is or customize, and downloadable visuals and 90-second videos on learning CPR and on using AEDs. We encourage you to share the kit with family, friends and colleagues to reach as many people as possible on or around October 16 – and ask them to share it too! Or simply just share our posts with friends, family and colleagues.

Remember to include #WorldRestartAHeart in your posts. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, which launched the WRAH initiative, will use the hashtag to track the number of posts. If you opt to lead a webinar or host an WRAH-related event, say, on Facebook, please share your attendance numbers (if you know them) with your Resuscitation Program Manager so we can include them in our Canada-wide tally.

Together, we can make the difference we seek.

Social Media Toolkit
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General Health & Wellness

Addressing Stigma: Towards a More Inclusive Health System – Report on the State of Public Health in Canada 2019 – Chief Public Health Officer of Public Health in Canada – 2019

Every year, the Chief Public Health Officer writes a report on the state of public health in Canada. These reports raise the profile of public health issues and stimulate dialogue. They can also lead to action in improving and protecting the health of Canadians. The 2019 report first provides a summary of the overall health of Canadians, including how different populations experience poorer health. The rest of the report focuses on stigma, one of the reasons for these differences.

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Adult Tobacco Cessation Campaign

From March 15 to 29, 2021, Health Canada’s Adult tobacco cessation campaign reminded Canadians 50+ who smoke that it’s never too late to quit and that getting support improves their chances of quitting.

We invite you to explore the campaign materials, and to kindly consider amplifying these important messages organically through your communication channels.

Click our Google Drive to view or download shareable content, including:

  • Video (or share directly from YouTube in English and French)
  • Animated banners
  • Facebook carousel
  • File with suggested text and URLs

You’ll also find newly updated web content at Canada.ca/quit-smoking.

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Announcement: New Website for the Live Well | Bien Vivre Program

A new website for the Live Well | Bien Vivre program has been launched.

LWBV is an evidence-based program using best practices to support client-led health behaviour change. Their professional health coaching is offered in English and French, at no charge, to all New Brunswickers 19 and older.

Website

Canadian Cancer Statistics: A 2022 special report on cancer prevalence

A new report released today by the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) shows that the number of people living with or beyond cancer in this country continues to grow, to over 1.5 million people. This prevalence figure, previously estimated to be 1 million a decade ago, is caused by both increased survival and incidence, making it both a reason for optimism and concern.

The report – Canadian Cancer Statistics: A 2022 special report on cancer prevalence – was developed by the Canadian Cancer Statistics Advisory Committee in collaboration with CCS, Statistics Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

The report details that at the beginning of 2018, an estimated 1.5 million people alive in Canada had been diagnosed with cancer in the previous 25 years; approximately 60% of whom were diagnosed 5 to 25 years ago. This highlights the high number of people living long-term with or beyond cancer.

“Investments in research are paying off in the form of better methods of timely detection and more effective treatments, and as a result, we’re now seeing more people surviving cancer and living longer with and beyond the disease,” explains Dr Jennifer Gillis, Senior Manager of Surveillance at CCS. “There has been much accomplished for us to collectively celebrate but these new data also reveal that our work is not nearly done.”

The rising prevalence is also attributable to rising cancer incidence, or more cases diagnosed. In 2012, approximately 193,000 people were diagnosed with cancer in Canada, rising to approximately 206,000 in 2017. Today, it is estimated that 233,900 people will be diagnosed with cancer in 2022. This growth in incidence is largely due to Canada’s growing and aging population and emphasizes the importance of cancer prevention.

“Increasing prevalence – more people being diagnosed and more surviving – creates long-term strain on our healthcare system and underlines why we must work together to create a system that can evolve as patients’ needs evolve from diagnosis through survival or end of life care,” adds Gillis.

Cancer’s toll on the healthcare system 

As more people live with or beyond cancer, an already stretched healthcare system will be faced with additional pressures. According to a September 2022 CCS-led report, Living at the crossroads of COVID-19 and cancer, the pandemic has meant delays and interruptions in care for many, which may result in late-stage diagnoses as our healthcare system struggles to cope with additional demand. Without new investments and supporting policies, our healthcare system will be under-resourced to keep up with the growing number of Canadians who will be impacted by cancer.

As the number of people living long-term with or beyond cancer increases, the support needed to ensure quality of life in the post-treatment and survivorship periods will increase as well.

After undergoing chemotherapy and radiation for her breast cancer diagnosis at age 30, J. Nadia Headley’s next step was the reconstruction process when suddenly the COVID-19 pandemic hit. Because of the strain the pandemic placed on the healthcare system, the surgeries she needed were rescheduled.

“Because of COVID-19, I had surgeries shifted twice, 4 to 5 months at a time,” says Nadia. “Each shift means the next ones get shifted too. You try to be patient and understand, but you just want to close the chapter on your cancer journey. We need to get better at preventing delays to healthcare.”

CCS is advocating for all levels of government to work together to help create a sustainable healthcare system for the 1.5 million people who need it right now. People in Canada need immediate investments in our healthcare system that ensure equitable and timely access to cancer care services for all, regardless of where they live or where they receive care. We created Voices for Change – a volunteer network for people who want to make a difference – because we know there is a growing community of people impacted by cancer who want to join our efforts to make cancer care better.

Advancing life-saving research 

“Research is one of our most valuable tools to turn the tide on the rising cancer prevalence in this country,” explains Gillis. “Thanks to advances in research, we are better today than ever before at preventing cancers, detecting them earlier and treating them more effectively, as well as helping people to live well with and beyond cancer.”

For example, because of research, we now know that virtually all cases of cervical cancer are due to HPV infection, that BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene variants play a significant role in breast, ovarian, prostate and pancreatic cancer risk, and that liquid biopsies can lead to more effective treatment and better outcomes for people with prostate cancer.

As more people are diagnosed with and survive cancer, more research investments are needed to help reduce cancer risk, improve methods of timely detection, diagnosis and treatment, and ensure people living with and beyond cancer have a high quality of life.

That’s why CCS continues to invest in world-leading research taking place across the country. Over the last 10 years, CCS has invested $640 million in cancer research and with the support of donors, aims to increase our annual investment in research steadily in the coming years. In 2021-22, CCS invested $44.33 million in cancer research that is helping more Canadians prevent cancer, live with and survive cancer, and improve life after cancer.

A key part of enhancing efforts to prevent cancer and support those living with and beyond cancer is CCS’s recent launch of its Centre for Cancer Prevention and Support (CCPS). A first-of-its kind facility in Canada, CCPS leads new nationwide research and programs that help prevent cancer before it happens and address the challenges of life after cancer.

Providing a support system 

While advances in research will offer long-term solutions to reduce the number of people developing cancer and increase the number of those who survive a diagnosis, supports are vital to help the over 1.5 million people currently living with or beyond cancer.

“From diagnosis to treatment and life after cancer or end-of-life, people need to feel supported throughout the experience, however long that may be,” adds Dr Gillis. “Compassionate support programs are such an important part of the cancer experience; they can help a diagnosis feel less scary, make treatment a little easier and help people facing cancer and survivors thrive.”

For more information on support programs available through the Canadian Cancer Society, visit cancer.ca.

To learn more about cancer in Canada, visit cancer.ca/statistics and view the full report or read the backgrounder. To lend your voice and help make cancer care better, sign up to be a Voice for Change. For programs and services to help you through the cancer experience, visit cancer.ca.

Quotes 

“Timely and accurate data on cancer prevalence in Canada is critical to understanding the disease’s toll on society and our healthcare system. Statistics Canada is proud to contribute to the Canadian Cancer Statistics report, which provides insight into the services and research required to better support the 1.5 million people living with cancer in Canada. Data are invaluable in assessing cancer outcomes, measuring how far we’ve come, and identifying areas for improvement.”
– Jeff Latimer, Director General, Health Statistics Branch, Statistics Canada

About Canadian Cancer Statistics
Canadian Cancer Statistics is developed through a collaboration of the Canadian Cancer Society, Statistics Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada. Cancer incidence and mortality data are from the Canadian Cancer Registry and the Canadian Vital Statistics Death databases, respectively, which are maintained at Statistics Canada. The data originate from the provincial and territorial cancer registries and vital statistics registrars. Statistics Canada completed all analyses related to this report, except for analysis by income and urban/rural status which were completed by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. The Public Health Agency of Canada completed the French translation of this report. The Canadian Cancer Society coordinates the production and dissemination of this publication and supports it with charitable funds. For more than 35 years, this publication has been providing information that helps decide what support and services are needed and what research should be done. It also helps assess the impact of prevention, early detection and treatment. For more information about Canadian Cancer Statistics, visit cancer.ca/statistics.

About the Canadian Cancer Society
The Canadian Cancer Society works tirelessly to save and improve lives. We fund the brightest minds in cancer research. We provide a compassionate support system for all those affected by cancer, across Canada and for all types of cancer. As the voice for people who care about cancer, we work with governments to shape a healthier society. No other organization does all that we do to make lives better today and transform the future of cancer forever.

Help us make a difference. Call 1-888-939-3333 or visit cancer.ca today.

Infographic
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Health Canada advisory – Unauthorized nicotine buccal pouches may pose serious health risks

Summary
Products:
 Nicotine buccal pouches (placed between the gum and cheek), also known as tobacco-less nicotine pouches and oral nicotine pouches.
Issue: Nicotine buccal pouches are unauthorized in Canada and may pose various serious health risks.
What to do: Do not use unauthorized nicotine buccal pouches.

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Health Canada announces funding for a tobacco cessation project to mark World No Tobacco Day 2021

News release

May 31, 2021   | Ottawa, Ontario   | Health Canada

Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of premature death and disease in Canada. It can harm nearly every organ in the body and plays a role in causing over 40 diseases and other serious health outcomes, from lung cancer to emphysema to heart disease.

Today, to mark World No Tobacco Day, the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Health, announced $3 million in funding for a national social marketing campaign to encourage people who smoke to quit. This campaign will be a collaborative effort between the Canadian Cancer Society, the Canadian Lung Association, the Canadian Public Health Association, and the Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada. Funding for this project was provided under Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program. The investment aligns with the objectives of Canada’s Tobacco Strategy, which aims to reduce tobacco use to less than 5% by 2035.

The Government of Canada is committed to working in partnership with organizations across the country to maximize the reach of public education efforts around the health risks associated with tobacco products, and to protect Canadians – particularly youth, non-users of tobacco products and young children – from the harms of smoking and nicotine addiction.

Quitting smoking can be difficult, but it is possible. Canadians who want to quit smoking do not have to do it alone. Services and supports are available to help Canadians quit smoking. Trained specialists with the pan-Canadian toll-free quit line can help individuals develop a quit-smoking plan, answer questions and provide referrals to programs and services in communities across Canada, including information on how to access quit-smoking medications that can help with the potential withdrawal symptoms. Canadians can reach a quit coach at 1-866-366-3667 or online, or can talk to their health care professional for assistance.

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Heart failure in Canada: complex, incurable and on the rise

Heart & Stroke News Release

Heart failure in Canada: complex, incurable and on the rise
A national action plan will increase access to diagnosis, care and support

February 1, 2022 – Heart failure is a serious and growing problem in Canada, putting a significant strain on
people living with the condition, their families and healthcare systems according to a new Heart & Stroke
report. Falling short: How Canada is failing people with heart failure and how we can change that reveals
that despite progress, navigating through siloed systems remains difficult and significant gaps still exist in
diagnosis, treatment and support.
In Canada there are 750,000 people living with heart failure and 100,000 people are diagnosed with this
incurable condition each year. According to a new Heart & Stroke poll* heart failure touches one in three
Canadians, either because they have it themselves or because it affects a family member or close friend.
“Heart failure is an epidemic. It’s one of the fastest growing cardiovascular conditions in the world,” says Dr.
Anique Ducharme, President of the Canadian Heart Failure Society, a professor of medicine at Université de
Montréal and a cardiologist at the Montreal Heart Institute.
Anything that damages the heart can lead to heart failure. Experts expect heart failure will continue to rise
due to the aging population and an increase in younger people being diagnosed due to better detection tools
and increased risk factors. As well, the COVID-19 virus can cause heart damage which can lead to heart
failure, and the pandemic disrupted healthcare services resulting in people with existing heart conditions not
accessing care and ending up sicker.

Heart failure costs everyone
Heart failure is a chronic condition caused by the heart not functioning as it should or by a problem with its
structure. It can happen if the heart is too weak or too stiff, or both. This often results in fatigue and
shortness of breath, and those living with the condition often experience depression and anxiety and reduced
quality of life. The toll can also be substantial on family and other caregivers who manage medications,
medical appointments and frequent trips to the emergency department.
“It is absolutely a full-time job,” says Heather Lannon, who cared for her husband, Jamie, for nine years after
his heart failure diagnosis.
Heart failure is one of the top reasons why people in Canada are hospitalized. In fact, it is often referred to
as a ‘revolving door’ condition because one in five heart failure patients will be readmitted to hospital within a
month of being discharged. By 2030, the healthcare costs associated with heart failure in Canada are
expected to reach $2.8 billion per year.

Complex, chronic, incurable – and misunderstood
Most people with heart failure have at least one other significant cardiovascular condition – and often up to
seven (for example diabetes, hypertension, atrial fibrillation), complicating treatment and impacting quality of
life. Nearly half of patients with heart failure will die within five years of being diagnosed.
According to the Heart & Stroke poll Canadians do not understand the condition or the urgency:
• Four in 10 Canadians do not understand what heart failure is.
• One in three Canadians do not know that heart failure is on the rise.
• Two in three Canadians do not know there is no cure for heart failure.

Fighting on all fronts to beat heart failure
Early diagnosis, lifestyle changes, access to medication, medical devices like pacemakers, artificial heart
valves or pumps, and community support can improve health outcomes and quality of life.
“I thought I was invincible. Heart failure brought me to my knees,” says Kevin Lobo, who was an athletic 38-
year-old when he was diagnosed with heart failure. A life-saving stent and medications, and eventually openheart surgery helped him manage his condition. He remains upbeat and determined to live a full life. “I still
drive. I still go to the gym. I still play golf. I do everything.”
Unfortunately, different circumstances can impact the treatment and support people with heart failure receive
including ethnicity, income, gender, and location.

According to a Heart & Stroke Heart Failure Resources and Services Inventory** there is room for significant
improvement in many areas of heart failure care across the country. For example, 27% of hospitals do not
have access to one of the procedures that is essential for diagnosing heart failure (natriuretic peptide testing)
and 16% of hospitals do not follow published heart failure care guidelines.
“There has been some progress to improve outcomes and quality of life for people living with heart failure,
informed by important research. But much more could — and should — be done, especially as heart failure
numbers continue to grow,” says Dr. Patrice Lindsay, Director, Health Systems, Heart & Stroke. “That’s why
Heart & Stroke brought together leading cardiac organizations and others from across the country to drive an
action plan, informed by nurses, cardiologists, pharmacists and people living with heart failure and their
caregivers.”
The action plan emphasizes an integrated approach to heart failure across Canada, including:
• Integrated systems of care
• Evidence-based care driven by high quality research
• Access to specialized care
• Coordinated and seamless transitions of care
• Support for people living with heart failure and their families and caregivers.
Other areas that will improve outcomes and quality of life for people living with heart failure include improved
access to necessary medications through a national, universal pharmacare program and expanded access
to virtual care.
*The national, bilingual online poll was conducted by Environics Research Group, with 2,257 Canadian residents 18 years and older,
Nov. 8-13 2021.
** The Heart & Stroke Heart Failure Resources and Services Inventory was conducted throughout 2021 and the interim data provided in
this report includes responses from 405 of the 654 acute healthcare facilities in Canada completed as of Nov. 18, 2021. Some values
may have minor changes once full data collection is complete.
About Heart & Stroke
Life. We don’t want you to miss it. That’s why Heart & Stroke leads the fight to beat heart disease and stroke.
We must generate the next medical breakthroughs, so Canadians don’t miss out on precious moments.
Together, we are working to prevent disease, save lives and promote recovery through research, health
promotion and public policy. Heartandstroke.ca @HeartandStroke

Full report
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Helping New Brunswickers Live Healthier Lives – New Brunswick Medical Society

As the old saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. The New Brunswick Medical Society believe strongly in being proactive, for the health of our patients and our system. New Brunswick’s future depends on the health of its population. Our health campaigns empower New Brunswickers to take control of their own health. See all our public education campaigns here.

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Improving the Health System – New Brunswick Medical Society

The New Brunswick Medical Society advocates for better health care for New Brunswick patients. This includes offering our suggestions for improvements, as well as speaking up when we think changes will negatively impact patient services. We work to ensure patients receive the best care possible – before they even set foot in a doctor’s office. See a list of our priorities here.

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Minister of Health announces funding for projects to help Canadians stop tobacco use

To mark World No Tobacco Day, the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Health, announced nearly $4.8 million in funding for organizations across Canada to develop programs and services that will help stop tobacco use among Canadians, and reduce youth vaping.

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Mouvement acadien des communautés en santé (ONLY AVAILABLE IN FRENCH)

Le Mouvement acadien des communautés en santé du Nouveau-Brunswick inc. (MACS-NB) is a community outreach network that promotes the concept of healthy communities. This concept promotes community and local community ownership of health through a collective approach to wellness.

Website
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November is CPR Month

1 in 4 women will die from heart disease. When they are in cardiac arrest in public, women are 27% less likely to receive bystander CPR… Why ?

Help stop the stigma that kills women

Find out why

A recent study shows that when AED pads are placed DIRECTLY on top of exposed metal underwire in order to MAXIMIZE the potential for arcing,  they had ZERO incidence of arcing or burning [126 shocks, 4 pigs, 200Joules).  There was also no incidence of redirection of current, and the shocks were 100% successful on the first try to restore rhythm. There is no science or research to support that shocking someone wearing an underwire bra is dangerous or reduces the efficacy of the shock(s). 

Study Information
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Podcast Archives – Q&A – Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Coalition

A popular podcast series featuring a variety of wellness subjects of interest to New Brunswickers.

Website
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Radon is the number one cause of lung cancer in non-smokers

This November, as part of Radon Action Month, Health Canada is encouraging Canadians to test their homes for radon. Radon is the number one cause of lung cancer in non-smokers, leading to the deaths of more than 3,200 Canadians each year.

Radon is a radioactive gas naturally produced by the breakdown of uranium in the ground. It can easily enter homes undetected through cracks and gaps in the floors and walls that are in contact with the ground. You can’t see it, smell it or taste it. All homes and buildings have some level of radon. The only question is how much and the only way to know is to test.

Find out what you can do on the Take Action on Radon web page, and don’t forget that some local libraries also have lending programs for radon detectors.

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Smoking history tied to worse COVID-19 outcomes

Cumulative cigarette smoke exposure is an independent risk factor for hospital admission and death from COVID-19, according to a research letter published online Jan. 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Learn More
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Société santé et mieux-être en français du Nouveau-Brunswick (ONLY AVAILABLE IN FRENCH)

La Société santé et mieux-être en français du Nouveau-Brunswick (SSMEFNB) is a consultative and supportive organization that promotes the improvement of the accessibility, continuity and quality of health services and programs and wellness for the Acadian and Francophone communities of New Brunswick. 

Website
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The New Brunswick Lung Association is promoting its annual influenza awareness campaign

The New Brunswick Lung Association is promoting its annual influenza awareness campaign with the goal to educate people on the reality that influenza can be life threatening. With many people still unvaccinated for Covid 19 and the emergence of new variants it is just as important as ever to get the influenza vaccination.

Get an influenza vaccination every year

It’s important that you get a new influenza vaccination every year because:

  • the type of flu virus usually changes from year to year
  • a new vaccine is created every year to protect you each flu season
  • the effectiveness of the flu vaccine can wear off, so you need a new one

         every year to stay protected

The influenza vaccination is safe

  • severe reactions are very rare
  • you can’t get the flu from the flu vaccination
  • most people have no side effects from the flu vaccination

There are now flu vaccines designed specifically for seniors “called high dose flu vaccine.” An enhancement to the NB influenza program includes offering the High-Dose vaccine to all those aged 65 years and older at no cost.

 

Ask your doctor about the flu vaccine that is recommended for you.

https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/flu-influenza.html

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The Wellness Movement

The Wellness Movement is a collective, ongoing effort in New Brunswick to inspire and support the creation of wellness-supporting environments, including tobacco-free and smoke-free homes, schools, workplaces and communities. Visit their website to join the Movement, find resources about a range of wellness topics, consult an events calendar of activities across the province and get inspired by New Brunswick success stories.

Website

The Wellness Movement – Determinants of Health Poster

A colorful, bilingual poster presenting the 12 determinants of health adopted as part of New Brunswick’s Wellness Strategy. Offered in 8½” by 14″ format to be printed and used as an educational tool to introduce the influence of the determinants of health on an individual’s wellness, or on a population’s general wellness levels.

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The Wellness Movement – Connect with Wellness in your Region

The Wellness Movement’s regional webpages make it easy to connect with your local Wellness Networks, and stay informed about wellness initiatives happening near you. You’ll find event calendars, resources, information, tools, photos, and inspiring stories, as well as a list of Regional Wellness Networks in your area.

Website

The Wellness Movement – Wellness Tip Card – Tobacco-Free Living – 2019

A tip card about tobacco-free living, one of the focus areas of The Wellness Movement.

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Top 3 in 10 – New Brunswick Medical Society

The New Brunswick Medical Society believes New Brunswick can be one of the top 3 healthiest provinces in 10 years. We imagine a province that supports its citizens to achieve their best health. Want to help us get there? Share our video and our message, and let us know your thoughts. What are your health challenges? What could be changed in your community that would make it easier for you to be healthy? Through simple, smart changes, we can reach our goal of being one of the top 3 healthiest Canadian provinces in 10 years – #top3in10.

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Webinar Archives – Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Coalition

Webinars on a variety of wellness subjects of interest to New Brunswickers.

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Wellness Lives with Us campaign

A new Wellness Movement campaign has been launched in New Brunswick!

We’re excited to share a new awareness campaign, Wellness Lives with Us, as part of the Wellness Movement in New Brunswick. It will run from June to October 2021.

The campaign shares messages that inspire thinking about the people, places and conditions, beyond the health care system, that influence the health and well-being of people and communities in NB.  People are encouraged to find out more by visiting a new landing page, and exploring resources, on the Wellness Movement website.

We need your help to spread the word about the Wellness Lives with Us campaign across New Brunswick!

Please share the campaign information with others.

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WHO – Tobacco responsible for 20% of deaths from coronary heart disease worldwide

Every year, 1.9 million people die from tobacco-induced heart disease, according to a new brief released today by the World Health Organization, World Heart Federation and the University of Newcastle Australia ahead of World Heart Day, marked on 29 September.

More Information

This was released in advance of World Heart Day, on Sept. 29.

What is World Heart Day?

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World Restart a Heart Day

o  We know that the vast majority of cardiac arrests occur outside the hospital.

o  We know that most people experiencing a cardiac arrest in this situation don’t survive.

o  We know that the quick response of bystanders increases the chance for survival.

On October 16, the fourth annual World Restart a Heart (WRAH) day, we invite you to participate in this global campaign to increase public awareness on cardiac arrest and on the importance of learning basic CPR skills and how to use an AED.

Join Heart & Stroke and our international partners by sharing an important message through social media: Everyone can learn basic CPR and how to use an AED.

Each year the theme of World Restart a Heart changes: this year’s theme is about survivors. If it’s possible to share a story or two of survivors who are still with us today thanks to bystander CPR, please use the hashtag #CPRSavedMyLife.

But our collective goal for the day never wavers: to increase bystander CPR to ultimately improve the survival rates of cardiac arrest to help save more lives.

We’ve prepared a social media kit for you that includes posts that you can use as is or customize, and downloadable visuals and 90-second videos on learning CPR and on using AEDs. We encourage you to share the kit with family, friends and colleagues to reach as many people as possible on or around October 16 – and ask them to share it too! Or simply just share our posts with friends, family and colleagues.

Remember to include #WorldRestartAHeart in your posts. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, which launched the WRAH initiative, will use the hashtag to track the number of posts. If you opt to lead a webinar or host an WRAH-related event, say, on Facebook, please share your attendance numbers (if you know them) with your Resuscitation Program Manager so we can include them in our Canada-wide tally.

Together, we can make the difference we seek.

Social Media Toolkit
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Reports and Statistics – Tobacco and Vaping Products Use and Exposure to Second-Hand Smoke

Achieving Tobacco-Free Living: A Priority in New Brunswick – New Brunswick Health Council – 2017

This infographic presents key statistics related to tobacco use in New Brunswick, including regional data. 

PDF

Canadian Cancer Statistics: A 2022 special report on cancer prevalence

A new report released today by the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) shows that the number of people living with or beyond cancer in this country continues to grow, to over 1.5 million people. This prevalence figure, previously estimated to be 1 million a decade ago, is caused by both increased survival and incidence, making it both a reason for optimism and concern.

The report – Canadian Cancer Statistics: A 2022 special report on cancer prevalence – was developed by the Canadian Cancer Statistics Advisory Committee in collaboration with CCS, Statistics Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

The report details that at the beginning of 2018, an estimated 1.5 million people alive in Canada had been diagnosed with cancer in the previous 25 years; approximately 60% of whom were diagnosed 5 to 25 years ago. This highlights the high number of people living long-term with or beyond cancer.

“Investments in research are paying off in the form of better methods of timely detection and more effective treatments, and as a result, we’re now seeing more people surviving cancer and living longer with and beyond the disease,” explains Dr Jennifer Gillis, Senior Manager of Surveillance at CCS. “There has been much accomplished for us to collectively celebrate but these new data also reveal that our work is not nearly done.”

The rising prevalence is also attributable to rising cancer incidence, or more cases diagnosed. In 2012, approximately 193,000 people were diagnosed with cancer in Canada, rising to approximately 206,000 in 2017. Today, it is estimated that 233,900 people will be diagnosed with cancer in 2022. This growth in incidence is largely due to Canada’s growing and aging population and emphasizes the importance of cancer prevention.

“Increasing prevalence – more people being diagnosed and more surviving – creates long-term strain on our healthcare system and underlines why we must work together to create a system that can evolve as patients’ needs evolve from diagnosis through survival or end of life care,” adds Gillis.

Cancer’s toll on the healthcare system 

As more people live with or beyond cancer, an already stretched healthcare system will be faced with additional pressures. According to a September 2022 CCS-led report, Living at the crossroads of COVID-19 and cancer, the pandemic has meant delays and interruptions in care for many, which may result in late-stage diagnoses as our healthcare system struggles to cope with additional demand. Without new investments and supporting policies, our healthcare system will be under-resourced to keep up with the growing number of Canadians who will be impacted by cancer.

As the number of people living long-term with or beyond cancer increases, the support needed to ensure quality of life in the post-treatment and survivorship periods will increase as well.

After undergoing chemotherapy and radiation for her breast cancer diagnosis at age 30, J. Nadia Headley’s next step was the reconstruction process when suddenly the COVID-19 pandemic hit. Because of the strain the pandemic placed on the healthcare system, the surgeries she needed were rescheduled.

“Because of COVID-19, I had surgeries shifted twice, 4 to 5 months at a time,” says Nadia. “Each shift means the next ones get shifted too. You try to be patient and understand, but you just want to close the chapter on your cancer journey. We need to get better at preventing delays to healthcare.”

CCS is advocating for all levels of government to work together to help create a sustainable healthcare system for the 1.5 million people who need it right now. People in Canada need immediate investments in our healthcare system that ensure equitable and timely access to cancer care services for all, regardless of where they live or where they receive care. We created Voices for Change – a volunteer network for people who want to make a difference – because we know there is a growing community of people impacted by cancer who want to join our efforts to make cancer care better.

Advancing life-saving research 

“Research is one of our most valuable tools to turn the tide on the rising cancer prevalence in this country,” explains Gillis. “Thanks to advances in research, we are better today than ever before at preventing cancers, detecting them earlier and treating them more effectively, as well as helping people to live well with and beyond cancer.”

For example, because of research, we now know that virtually all cases of cervical cancer are due to HPV infection, that BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene variants play a significant role in breast, ovarian, prostate and pancreatic cancer risk, and that liquid biopsies can lead to more effective treatment and better outcomes for people with prostate cancer.

As more people are diagnosed with and survive cancer, more research investments are needed to help reduce cancer risk, improve methods of timely detection, diagnosis and treatment, and ensure people living with and beyond cancer have a high quality of life.

That’s why CCS continues to invest in world-leading research taking place across the country. Over the last 10 years, CCS has invested $640 million in cancer research and with the support of donors, aims to increase our annual investment in research steadily in the coming years. In 2021-22, CCS invested $44.33 million in cancer research that is helping more Canadians prevent cancer, live with and survive cancer, and improve life after cancer.

A key part of enhancing efforts to prevent cancer and support those living with and beyond cancer is CCS’s recent launch of its Centre for Cancer Prevention and Support (CCPS). A first-of-its kind facility in Canada, CCPS leads new nationwide research and programs that help prevent cancer before it happens and address the challenges of life after cancer.

Providing a support system 

While advances in research will offer long-term solutions to reduce the number of people developing cancer and increase the number of those who survive a diagnosis, supports are vital to help the over 1.5 million people currently living with or beyond cancer.

“From diagnosis to treatment and life after cancer or end-of-life, people need to feel supported throughout the experience, however long that may be,” adds Dr Gillis. “Compassionate support programs are such an important part of the cancer experience; they can help a diagnosis feel less scary, make treatment a little easier and help people facing cancer and survivors thrive.”

For more information on support programs available through the Canadian Cancer Society, visit cancer.ca.

To learn more about cancer in Canada, visit cancer.ca/statistics and view the full report or read the backgrounder. To lend your voice and help make cancer care better, sign up to be a Voice for Change. For programs and services to help you through the cancer experience, visit cancer.ca.

Quotes 

“Timely and accurate data on cancer prevalence in Canada is critical to understanding the disease’s toll on society and our healthcare system. Statistics Canada is proud to contribute to the Canadian Cancer Statistics report, which provides insight into the services and research required to better support the 1.5 million people living with cancer in Canada. Data are invaluable in assessing cancer outcomes, measuring how far we’ve come, and identifying areas for improvement.”
– Jeff Latimer, Director General, Health Statistics Branch, Statistics Canada

About Canadian Cancer Statistics
Canadian Cancer Statistics is developed through a collaboration of the Canadian Cancer Society, Statistics Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada. Cancer incidence and mortality data are from the Canadian Cancer Registry and the Canadian Vital Statistics Death databases, respectively, which are maintained at Statistics Canada. The data originate from the provincial and territorial cancer registries and vital statistics registrars. Statistics Canada completed all analyses related to this report, except for analysis by income and urban/rural status which were completed by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. The Public Health Agency of Canada completed the French translation of this report. The Canadian Cancer Society coordinates the production and dissemination of this publication and supports it with charitable funds. For more than 35 years, this publication has been providing information that helps decide what support and services are needed and what research should be done. It also helps assess the impact of prevention, early detection and treatment. For more information about Canadian Cancer Statistics, visit cancer.ca/statistics.

About the Canadian Cancer Society
The Canadian Cancer Society works tirelessly to save and improve lives. We fund the brightest minds in cancer research. We provide a compassionate support system for all those affected by cancer, across Canada and for all types of cancer. As the voice for people who care about cancer, we work with governments to shape a healthier society. No other organization does all that we do to make lives better today and transform the future of cancer forever.

Help us make a difference. Call 1-888-939-3333 or visit cancer.ca today.

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Canadian Tobacco and Nicotine Survey 2019 – Statistics Canada – 2020d

Vaping is the act of inhaling and exhaling vapour produced by a device such as an electronic cigarette (e-cigarette), vape mod, vaporizer or vape pen.

While some use these devices to curtail or to quit smoking, vaping can also have negative effects, particularly among youth. According to Health Canada, the majority of vaping products contain nicotine, and vaping can lead to nicotine addiction. Vaping may also increase the risk of exposure to other harmful chemicals.

For the first time, Statistics Canada has collected detailed information about vaping. The new Canadian Tobacco and Nicotine Survey aims to shed light on the types of products Canadians are using, how often they are vaping and their reasons for doing so.

Website

Canadian Tobacco and Nicotine Survey, 2020, results released

On March 17, 2021, initial results from the Canadian Tobacco and Nicotine Survey (CTNS), 2020, were released.  Below is information from Statistics Canada.  CTNS was first conducted in 2019. CTNS smoking prevalence has tracked lower than the Canadian Community Health Survey, which has a much larger sample size.

In 2019, the survey was conducted between Dec. 8, 2019 and Jan. 16, 2021.

Full Report

Canadian Tobacco and Nicotine Survey, 2021

Released: 2022-05-05

According to recent results from the 2021 Canadian Tobacco and Nicotine Survey (CTNS), vaping continues to be more prevalent among younger adults than older age groups. Results indicate that in 2021, 13% of youth (aged 15 to 19) and 17% of young adults (aged 20 to 24) reported having vaped at least once during the 30-day period before the survey, compared with 4% of adults aged 25 or older. Vaping to reduce stress has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic for those aged 15 to 19 and was reported as the main reason for vaping within this age group (33%).

Vaping is the act of inhaling and exhaling vapour produced by a device such as an electronic cigarette (e-cigarette), vape mod, vaporizer or vape pen. While some people use these devices to reduce or to quit smoking, vaping can also have negative effects on health, particularly among youth or non-smokers. According to Health Canada, the majority of vaping products contain nicotine and, like tobacco, can lead to nicotine addiction. Vaping may also increase the risk of exposure to other harmful chemicals.

A third cycle of the CTNS was conducted from mid-December 2021 to early February 2022. The CTNS was conducted by Statistics Canada in collaboration with Health Canada to obtain information about vaping and smoking habits.

Vaping remains stable among youth aged 15 to 19

A higher percentage of youth and young adults reported having ever tried vaping at some point in their life compared with adults aged 25 and older. In 2021, nearly half (48%) of young adults aged 20 to 24 and nearly 3 in 10 (29%) youth aged 15 to 19 reported having ever tried vaping at some point in their life, compared with 13% of adults aged 25 and older.

Among young adults aged 20 to 24, the rate of those who vaped in the past 30 days remained stable between 2019 and 2020, but increased from 13% in 2020 to 17% in 2021. On the other hand, this rate has remained stable over the last three years (since this survey started) among youth aged 15 to 19 (13% in 2021) and adults aged 25 and older (4% in 2021).

Overall, 5% of Canadians reported having vaped in the past 30 days. New Brunswick had the highest rate of vaping (9%), followed by Prince Edward Island (8%) and Quebec (6%).

A higher proportion of Canadians reported vaping on a daily basis in 2021 compared with before the pandemic (2019). Among those who reported vaping in the past 30 days, 55% responded that they vaped on a daily basis, compared with 44% in 2019.

More youth aged 15 to 19 report vaping to reduce stress than in 2019

Since there are health risks associated with vaping, particularly for youth, it is important to understand the reasons why Canadians are vaping.

In 2021, among people who vaped in the past 30 days, 18% reported that their main reason for vaping was to reduce stress. Compared with 2019 results (21%), stress reduction was more commonly reported as the main reason for vaping by youth aged 15 to 19 in 2021 (33%). This may be an indication that youth aged 15 to 19 are vaping in part to cope with stress caused by the pandemic and other difficult situations, such as ongoing disruptions to education and workplaces.

In addition to reducing stress, youth aged 15 to 19 reported vaping because they enjoyed it (28%) and because they wanted to try it (24%). Among young adults aged 20 to 24, the most commonly reported reasons for vaping were because they enjoyed it (27%); to reduce stress (25%); or to reduce, quit or avoid returning to smoking (24%). In contrast, a higher proportion of Canadians aged 25 and older reported vaping to reduce, quit or avoid returning to smoking (58%) as their main reason, while another 14% reported vaping because they enjoyed it.

Fruit and mint or menthol are the most vaped flavours

Flavours have been identified as one of the potential factors contributing to the high proportion of youth vaping in Canada.

Among people who vaped in the past 30 days, across all age groups, the most vaped flavours were fruit (53%) followed by mint or menthol (18%).

Chart 1 
Most often used flavour among those who vaped in the 30 days before the survey, by age group, 2021, Canada, excluding the territories

Flavour preferences varied by age group but not by gender. More vapers from the youngest age group (aged 15 to 19) preferred fruit flavours (65%) compared with adults aged 20 to 24 (57%) and those aged 25 and older (48%).

By contrast, tobacco flavour was more popular among users aged 25 and older (14%) than it was among the younger age groups (1% among youth aged 15 to 19 and 2% among adults aged 20 to 24).

Most youth who vape have never smoked tobacco

One of the potential uses of vaping is to reduce or quit smoking tobacco. However, among those who reported having vaped in the past 30 days, a majority (61%) of youth aged 15 to 19 and more than one-quarter (27%) of young adults aged 20 to 24 had never tried a tobacco cigarette in their life. This finding suggests that the majority of youth are not using vaping devices to reduce or quit smoking.

Overall in 2021, 10% of Canadians reported smoking cigarettes on a regular basis. For all age groups, cigarette smoking remained stable compared with the previous year.

In 2021, approximately three times more Canadians aged 20 and older (11%) reported being a current smoker than those aged 15 to 19 (4%).

Finally, smoking continued to be more prevalent among men than women in 2021, with 12% of men reporting that they were current smokers compared with 9% of women.

Table 1
Percentage of Canadians aged 15 and older who vaped in their lifetime or in the 30 days before the survey, by age group or gender, 2021, Canada, excluding the territories

Table 2
Percentage of Canadians aged 15 and older by smoking status, by age group or gender, 2021, Canada, excluding the territories

  Note to readers

Data in this release are from the 2021 Canadian Tobacco and Nicotine Survey (CTNS), which collects information about the prevalence of cigarette smoking, vaping and cannabis use. The survey was conducted from December 2021 to February 2022, and information was collected from 9,908 respondents. Even though the collection period ended in February 2022, 2021 is used to designate this collection period to simplify the text. The target population was non-institutionalized people aged 15 and older living in Canada’s 10 provinces who do not live in collective dwellings or on reserves. Questionnaire content was developed in collaboration with Health Canada. Previous cycles were conducted from October to December 2019 and from December 2020 to January 2021, and data from these cycles are provided to examine time trends.

In the context of this analysis, vaping includes vaping e-liquid—with and without nicotine (i.e., just flavouring)—and using an e-cigarette, vape mod, vaporizer or vape pen. The analysis excludes vaping cannabis.

Respondents who reported having used a vaping product at least once during the 30-day period preceding the survey, also referred to as “vaped in the past 30 days,” were asked about the type of product used, frequency of use and reasons for vaping. Survey sampling weights were applied so that the analyses would be representative of the targeted population.

Respondents were asked to identify their main reason for vaping in the 30 days before the survey. Users were classified across the following categories: those who just wanted to try; those who reported enjoying it; those who vaped to reduce stress; those who vaped to reduce, quit or avoid returning to smoking; and those who mentioned other reasons.

In addition, those who reported vaping in the 30 days before the survey were asked to identify the flavour they vaped most often. Flavours were categorized as follows: tobacco, fruit, candy or dessert, mint or menthol, and other flavours.

Full Report

Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS) – Statistics Canada (2017)

General population survey of tobacco, alcohol and drug use among Canadians aged 15 years and older conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Health Canada. This national survey provides valuable information to inform approaches to addressing complex health and social issues such as the problematic use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs, including opioids and cannabis.

TAKE NOTE!
As of 2019, information on tobacco and vaping product use in the Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS) has been discontinued and replaced by the Canadian Tobacco & Nicotine and Drugs Survey.

2017
Previous years

Cigarette butts are more harmful than plastic straws and stir sticks

Cigarette butts have been identified as a much more frequent waste problem than plastic straws or carrier bags. In the most recent Greats Canadian Shoreline Cleanup, cigarette butts far exceeded other plastic waste.

Continued exceptionalism for the tobacco industry?

It has long been observed that tobacco manufacturers are  frequently exempted from regulations that are applied to other industries. In the case of the federal plastics strategy, Environment and Climate Change Canada has made clear the reasons it is exempting cigarette filters from its ban on single use plastics.

The department established 3 criteria to decide which single-use plastics to ban: 1) whether they were found in the environment, 2) whether they were often not recycled and 3) whether they have readily available alternatives.

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Comparative Federal/Provincial/Territorial Tobacco Tax Rates As of August 1, 2020

200 Cigarettes     200 roll-your-own

cigarettes (100g)

NS      $70.63 ($59.04)    $46.00  ($40.00)

Man    $68.18 ($60.00)  $50.09 ($45.50)

PEI     $65.11 ($55.04)    $31.80 ($27.52)

NB      $61.83 ($51.04)    $30.07  ($25.52)

NWT   $60.80                  $27.20

Sask   $60.65 ($54.00)    $29.82  ($27.00)

Nun     $60.00               $40.00

Yuk     $60.00                   $30.00

N&L    $59.58 ($49.00)    $46.00  ($40.00)

BC      $59.00                  $39.50

Alta     $55.00                   $41.25

Ont     $44.45 ($36.95)     $21.56  ($18.475)

Que    $29.80                   $14.90

federal ~$29.53 ($24.84)  ~$17.45 ($15.53)

Notes re the table:

Inflationary increases are implemented federally each April 1 beginning in 2019.  An inflation increase is to be implemented in the Yukon each January 1, beginning in 2019, provided that the inflation rate is above a minimum threshold, which was not the case for Jan. 2019 nor Jan. 2020.

Here are the tax increases for cigarettes and roll-your-own so far in 2020, with the effective dates:

Jan. 1, 2020      BC        $4.00    $2.00

Feb. 26, 2020    NS        $4.00  $14.00

April 1, 2020     Fed      $0.46    $0.29    federal annual inflationary increase

July 15, 2020    PEI       $5.04    $6.02

PEI has increased tobacco taxes by $5.04 per carton of 200 cigarettes, and by $6.02 per 200 roll-your-own cigarettes (100g), effective July 15, 2020.

Here is a PEI Department of Finance Tobacco Tax Notice regarding the tobacco tax increase:

PDF

Global report on trends in prevalence of tobacco use 2000-2025 – World Health Organization

Progress in reducing tobacco use is a key indicator for measuring countries’ efforts to implement the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Countries have adopted this indicator to report progress towards SDG target 3.a and the tobacco reduction target under the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases 2013–2020. This report presents WHO estimates of tobacco use prevalence, numbers or users, and changes between 2000 and 2018, projected to 2025. Estimates are at global, regional and country level.

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Health Characteristics, Annual Estimates (2018): Smoking – Statistics Canada – 2018

Statistics updated yearly. National and provincial data estimates for:

  • Current smoker, daily or occasional
  • Current smoker, daily

Broken down by age group and sex.

Website

Heart failure in Canada: complex, incurable and on the rise

Heart & Stroke News Release

Heart failure in Canada: complex, incurable and on the rise
A national action plan will increase access to diagnosis, care and support

February 1, 2022 – Heart failure is a serious and growing problem in Canada, putting a significant strain on
people living with the condition, their families and healthcare systems according to a new Heart & Stroke
report. Falling short: How Canada is failing people with heart failure and how we can change that reveals
that despite progress, navigating through siloed systems remains difficult and significant gaps still exist in
diagnosis, treatment and support.
In Canada there are 750,000 people living with heart failure and 100,000 people are diagnosed with this
incurable condition each year. According to a new Heart & Stroke poll* heart failure touches one in three
Canadians, either because they have it themselves or because it affects a family member or close friend.
“Heart failure is an epidemic. It’s one of the fastest growing cardiovascular conditions in the world,” says Dr.
Anique Ducharme, President of the Canadian Heart Failure Society, a professor of medicine at Université de
Montréal and a cardiologist at the Montreal Heart Institute.
Anything that damages the heart can lead to heart failure. Experts expect heart failure will continue to rise
due to the aging population and an increase in younger people being diagnosed due to better detection tools
and increased risk factors. As well, the COVID-19 virus can cause heart damage which can lead to heart
failure, and the pandemic disrupted healthcare services resulting in people with existing heart conditions not
accessing care and ending up sicker.

Heart failure costs everyone
Heart failure is a chronic condition caused by the heart not functioning as it should or by a problem with its
structure. It can happen if the heart is too weak or too stiff, or both. This often results in fatigue and
shortness of breath, and those living with the condition often experience depression and anxiety and reduced
quality of life. The toll can also be substantial on family and other caregivers who manage medications,
medical appointments and frequent trips to the emergency department.
“It is absolutely a full-time job,” says Heather Lannon, who cared for her husband, Jamie, for nine years after
his heart failure diagnosis.
Heart failure is one of the top reasons why people in Canada are hospitalized. In fact, it is often referred to
as a ‘revolving door’ condition because one in five heart failure patients will be readmitted to hospital within a
month of being discharged. By 2030, the healthcare costs associated with heart failure in Canada are
expected to reach $2.8 billion per year.

Complex, chronic, incurable – and misunderstood
Most people with heart failure have at least one other significant cardiovascular condition – and often up to
seven (for example diabetes, hypertension, atrial fibrillation), complicating treatment and impacting quality of
life. Nearly half of patients with heart failure will die within five years of being diagnosed.
According to the Heart & Stroke poll Canadians do not understand the condition or the urgency:
• Four in 10 Canadians do not understand what heart failure is.
• One in three Canadians do not know that heart failure is on the rise.
• Two in three Canadians do not know there is no cure for heart failure.

Fighting on all fronts to beat heart failure
Early diagnosis, lifestyle changes, access to medication, medical devices like pacemakers, artificial heart
valves or pumps, and community support can improve health outcomes and quality of life.
“I thought I was invincible. Heart failure brought me to my knees,” says Kevin Lobo, who was an athletic 38-
year-old when he was diagnosed with heart failure. A life-saving stent and medications, and eventually openheart surgery helped him manage his condition. He remains upbeat and determined to live a full life. “I still
drive. I still go to the gym. I still play golf. I do everything.”
Unfortunately, different circumstances can impact the treatment and support people with heart failure receive
including ethnicity, income, gender, and location.

According to a Heart & Stroke Heart Failure Resources and Services Inventory** there is room for significant
improvement in many areas of heart failure care across the country. For example, 27% of hospitals do not
have access to one of the procedures that is essential for diagnosing heart failure (natriuretic peptide testing)
and 16% of hospitals do not follow published heart failure care guidelines.
“There has been some progress to improve outcomes and quality of life for people living with heart failure,
informed by important research. But much more could — and should — be done, especially as heart failure
numbers continue to grow,” says Dr. Patrice Lindsay, Director, Health Systems, Heart & Stroke. “That’s why
Heart & Stroke brought together leading cardiac organizations and others from across the country to drive an
action plan, informed by nurses, cardiologists, pharmacists and people living with heart failure and their
caregivers.”
The action plan emphasizes an integrated approach to heart failure across Canada, including:
• Integrated systems of care
• Evidence-based care driven by high quality research
• Access to specialized care
• Coordinated and seamless transitions of care
• Support for people living with heart failure and their families and caregivers.
Other areas that will improve outcomes and quality of life for people living with heart failure include improved
access to necessary medications through a national, universal pharmacare program and expanded access
to virtual care.
*The national, bilingual online poll was conducted by Environics Research Group, with 2,257 Canadian residents 18 years and older,
Nov. 8-13 2021.
** The Heart & Stroke Heart Failure Resources and Services Inventory was conducted throughout 2021 and the interim data provided in
this report includes responses from 405 of the 654 acute healthcare facilities in Canada completed as of Nov. 18, 2021. Some values
may have minor changes once full data collection is complete.
About Heart & Stroke
Life. We don’t want you to miss it. That’s why Heart & Stroke leads the fight to beat heart disease and stroke.
We must generate the next medical breakthroughs, so Canadians don’t miss out on precious moments.
Together, we are working to prevent disease, save lives and promote recovery through research, health
promotion and public policy. Heartandstroke.ca @HeartandStroke

Full report
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How the pandemic got people smoking again

The pandemic has encouraged us to pick up some pretty bad habits: bingeing (of televisionfood, and alcohol varieties), ghostingdoomscrollingimpulse shopping — but one that seems particularly counterintuitive is smoking. The choice to smoke feels strange right now for so many reasons: It’s an unnecessary expense in a time that has made our wallets tight, nicotine withdrawals can make users jittery, and it puts our lung health at risk.

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My Community at a Glance – New Brunswick Health Council – 2017

The goal of these community profiles, published by the New Brunswick Health Council, is to empower individuals with information about their community to stimulate interest in building healthier communities. The information in each profile (including tobacco use) gives a comprehensive view about the people who live, learn, work, and take part in community life. 33 New Brunswick Community Profile Reports were released in 2017.

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New Brunswick Population Health Data – New Brunswick Health Council

The New Brunswick Health Council (NBHC) was created by legislation in 2008 to report publicly on the performance of the provincial health system and to engage citizens in the improvement of health services quality. All the latest population health data for the province is available on its website.

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Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic – World Health Organization – 2019

The seventh WHO Report on the global tobacco epidemic analyses national efforts to implement the most effective measures from the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) that are proven to reduce demand for tobacco.

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Study: Tobacco Use and Food Insecurity in New Brunswick

The aim of this study is to determine the nature of the relationship between smoking, food insecurity, and health outcomes.

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Test your tobacco control knowledge!

How well have you been following tobacco control events in Canada?

Take 10 minutes to test your knowledge of recent events. Bragging rights are a short quiz away!…. (and yes, there are some trick questions).

TAKE THE QUIZ HERE

Information on these and other current topics in tobacco recently released by Physicians For A Smoke-Free Canada can be found here:

Tobacco in Canada Environmental Scan – March 2020
Tobacco Retailing: March 2020
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The Canadian Cancer Society has released an update to the report, University and College 100% Smoke-Free Campuses in Canada: National Status Report

Excellent resource explaining and demonstrating the benefits of a 100% smoke-free campus policy. This report presents a list of all colleges and universities with a smoke-free policy and includes links to examples of smoke-free policies from different post-secondary institutions in Canada.

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WHO – Tobacco responsible for 20% of deaths from coronary heart disease worldwide

Every year, 1.9 million people die from tobacco-induced heart disease, according to a new brief released today by the World Health Organization, World Heart Federation and the University of Newcastle Australia ahead of World Heart Day, marked on 29 September.

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This was released in advance of World Heart Day, on Sept. 29.

What is World Heart Day?

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World Restart a Heart Day

o  We know that the vast majority of cardiac arrests occur outside the hospital.

o  We know that most people experiencing a cardiac arrest in this situation don’t survive.

o  We know that the quick response of bystanders increases the chance for survival.

On October 16, the fourth annual World Restart a Heart (WRAH) day, we invite you to participate in this global campaign to increase public awareness on cardiac arrest and on the importance of learning basic CPR skills and how to use an AED.

Join Heart & Stroke and our international partners by sharing an important message through social media: Everyone can learn basic CPR and how to use an AED.

Each year the theme of World Restart a Heart changes: this year’s theme is about survivors. If it’s possible to share a story or two of survivors who are still with us today thanks to bystander CPR, please use the hashtag #CPRSavedMyLife.

But our collective goal for the day never wavers: to increase bystander CPR to ultimately improve the survival rates of cardiac arrest to help save more lives.

We’ve prepared a social media kit for you that includes posts that you can use as is or customize, and downloadable visuals and 90-second videos on learning CPR and on using AEDs. We encourage you to share the kit with family, friends and colleagues to reach as many people as possible on or around October 16 – and ask them to share it too! Or simply just share our posts with friends, family and colleagues.

Remember to include #WorldRestartAHeart in your posts. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, which launched the WRAH initiative, will use the hashtag to track the number of posts. If you opt to lead a webinar or host an WRAH-related event, say, on Facebook, please share your attendance numbers (if you know them) with your Resuscitation Program Manager so we can include them in our Canada-wide tally.

Together, we can make the difference we seek.

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Funding & Grants

Funding and grants available to lead tobacco and vaping product education and prevention projects are listed on our Funding & Grants page.

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