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Frequently Asked Questions

Where can I get help to quit smoking? 
Where can I go for resources to help a loved one quit smoking?

Where is smoking and vaping prohibited in New Brunswick?

Where is smoking and vaping prohibited when it comes to children/minors?

I have seen someone smoking or vaping around their child. Where can I report it?

I have seen someone smoking or vaping in a designated non-smoking area. How can I report it?

How can I get my landlord to enforce a smoke-free policy? 
How can I get my landlord to make my neighbour stop smoking or vaping?

Does my outdoor event need to be smoke-free? 
How can I organize a smoke-free event outdoors? 

How do I stop people from smoking or vaping during my outdoor event?

I thought electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) were useful in quitting smoking?

Where can I get more information on the rules and regulations I must follow as a responsible tobacco retailer?

I have concerns related to cannabis use and/or the dangers of second-hand cannabis smoke. Where can I get information on this topic?

Where do I report someone smoking cannabis in a public place?

 

 

Where can I get help to quit smoking?
Where can I go for resources to help a loved one quit smoking?

There are many excellent - services and resources available to help you quit smoking. 

Smoking cessation support is offered to patients of Horizon Health Network’s hospitals and health centres. Please consult this link to find your local Horizon Health facility: http://en.horizonnb.ca/facilities-and-services/services/addictions-and-mental-health/smoking-cessation-program.aspx.

Smoking Cessation Clinics are offered by Vitalité Health Network The clinics provide individual consultations to those who want to stop smoking. Smokers interested in stopping are monitored by a counselor who provides information and tips on giving up tobacco. Contact your nearest clinic to set up an appointment: http://www.vitalitenb.ca/en/points-service/smoking-cessation-clinic-0.

We also recommend you contact the Smoker’s Helpline. Smokers' Helpline is a free, confidential service operated by the Canadian Cancer Society offering support and information about quitting smoking and tobacco use. Smokers' Helpline is evidence-based, non-judgmental and personalized. Bilingual services are offered by phone and online at 1 877 513-5333 and http://smokershelpline.ca/.

You can download and read a copy of the “On the Road to Quitting” guides by Health Canada. These guides will give you the information and skills you need to successfully stop smoking. Spend some time reviewing the booklets to understand what to expect during your quit attempt and learn tips to help you along the way. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/pubs/tobac-tabac/road-voie-eng.php  

Finally, there is a list of additional resources related to quitting smoking on the New Brunswick Anti-Tobacco Coalition’s website: http://nbatc.ca/en/index.php?page=additional-resources.

Best of luck! 

 

Where is smoking and vaping prohibited in New Brunswick?

The Smoke-Free Places Act eliminates exposure to second-hand smoke where we work, learn and play, which helps protect our health, prevent smoking initiation by youth and prevents relapses in adults who are trying to or have already quit.

New Brunswick's Smoke-Free Places Act prohibits smoking and vaping tobacco, cannabis and all other substances in all enclosed public places, indoor workplaces, school grounds, as well as in vehicles when a person under the age of 16 is present. Many public outdoor settings, including the following, also prohibit smoking and vaping as per the Act: 

  • On patios where food and/or alcohol is served and within 3m from the patio boundary
  • 9m from doorways, windows and air intakes of buildings that are for public use
  • In outdoor playgrounds and within 20m of their perimeters (examples include outdoor: slides, swings, climbing structures, splash pads, wading pools, sand boxes)
  • On outdoor sports and recreational areas and within 20m of their perimeters (examples include outdoor: tennis courts, baseball fields, soccer fields, swimming pools, beaches, skateboard parks, skating rinks, etc., and their spectator stands)
  • On a public walking trail and within 9m of the trail
  • In provincial parks (except in designated smoking areas and on an occupied campsite)
  • On the grounds of regional health authorities (hospitals, health clinics, etc.)

Since September 15, 2017, peace officers and inspectors are able to issue tickets to individuals who smoke or vape in public places where smoking and vaping are banned.

A toll-free number is provided to report violations of the Smoke-free Places Act and to obtain additional information on this legislation: 1-866-234-4234. 

The NB Government also provides some excellent information on tobacco-free living and the Smoke-Free Places Act via the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health’s (Public Health) website

 

Where is smoking and vaping prohibited when it comes to children/minors?

The Smoke-Free Places Act protects children from dangerous exposure to second-hand smoke by prohibiting smoking and vaping (tobacco, cannabis, as well as any other substance that produces smoke or second-hand smoke) in schools and on school grounds as well as in vehicles when a person under the age of 16 is present.

As of July 1, 2015, the Smoke-Free Places Act has expanded its reach to include many public outdoor settings. These include many places parents might frequent with their children:

  • On patios where food and/or alcohol is served and within 3m from the patio boundary;
  • 9m from doorways, windows and air intakes of buildings that are for public use;
  • In outdoor playgrounds and within 20m of their perimeters (examples include outdoor slides, swings, climbing structures, splash pads, wading pools, sand boxes);
  • On outdoor sports and recreational areas and within 20m of their perimeters (examples include outdoor tennis courts, baseball fields, soccer fields, swimming pools, beaches, skateboard parks, skating rinks, etc., and their spectator stands);
  • On a public walking trail and within 9m of the trail;
  • In provincial parks (except in designated smoking areas and on an occupied campsite); and
  • On the grounds of regional health authorities (hospitals, health clinics, etc.)

Since September 15, 2017, peace officers and inspectors are able to issue tickets to individuals who smoke or vape in public places where smoking and vapping are banned.

A toll-free number is provided to report violations of the Smoke-free Places Act and to obtain additional information on this legislation: 1-866-234-4234. 

The Smoke-Free Places Act cannot, however, impose nor control whether parents and legal guardians choose to smoke or vape around their children in their homes. The New Brunswick Anti-Tobacco Coalition strongly recommends that parents and legal guardians refrain from smoking and vaping inside their homes. No amount of exposure to second-hand smoke is safe! Babies and children are especially at risk for developing illnesses related to second-hand smoke because their immune systems are less developed, they have smaller bodies and faster breathing rates than adults.  Furthermore, third-hand smoke, which is tobacco smoke contamination that remains behind after a cigarette is extinguished, is another potential health hazard in homes which allow smoking. This toxic residue clings to carpets, furniture, walls, clothing, hair, etc., long after smoking has stopped. Infants and children are especially at risk as they crawl on carpets and furniture and put things in their mouths. 

Links to more information on second and third-hand smoke in the home as well as tips for ensuring your home is kept smoke-free can be found on the New Brunswick Anti-Tobacco Coalition website: http://nbatc.ca/en/index.php?page=homes.  

 

I have seen someone smoking or vaping around their child. Where can I report it?

The Smoke-Free Places Act protects children from dangerous exposure to second-hand smoke by prohibiting smoking and vaping (tobacco, cannabis, as well as any other substance that produces smoke or second-hand smoke) in schools and on school grounds as well as in vehicles when a person under the age of 16 is present.  It also prohibits smoking and vaping in many outdoor spaces often frequented by children such as playgrounds, sports and recreational areas, public walking trails and provincial parks as well as other public places children might be present with their parents or legal guardians (patios where food is served, near doorways of public buildings, on the grounds of hospitals and health clinics, etc.).

The Smoke-Free Places Act cannot, however, impose nor control whether parents and legal guardians choose to smoke or vape around their children in their own homes or in spaces that are not regulated under the Act. Peace officers and inspectors are able to issue tickets to individuals who smoke or vape in public places where smoking and vaping are banned. If you suspect a violation to the Act, you can report it by calling this toll-free number: 1-866-234-4234.

 

I have seen someone smoking or vaping in a designated non-smoking area. How can I report it?

Peace officers and inspectors are able to issue tickets to individuals who smoke or vape in public places where smoking and vaping are banned.

A toll-free number is provided to report violations of the Smoke-free Places Act and to obtain additional information on this legislation: 1-866-234-4234. 

 

How can I get my landlord to enforce a smoke-free policy?
How can I get my landlord to make my neighbour stop smoking or vaping?

New Brunswick’s Smoke-Free Places Act is the piece of legislation that prohibits smoking and vaping (tobacco, cannabis, as well as any substance that produces smoke and second-hand smoke) in a variety of public indoor and outdoor spaces. 

Smoking and vaping are permitted on private property and in private residences (home), UNLESS the residence is a multi-unit residential building, in which case, it is prohibited by law to smoke and vape within 9m from doors, air intakes and windows. 

HOWEVER, the entirety of the rental unit that a tenant has paid for and has exclusive access to, including the patio, is considered private property and is therefore exempt from the restricted no-smoking/no-vaping zones

It is up to landlords to decide whether or not they want their entire building to be 100% smoke-free, inform their tenants and enforce their smoke-free policy. 

As a tenant, you can certainly talk to your landlord about the advantages of instating a smoke-free policy in his building. You can also choose to rent only from landlords who are proactive and have such a policy in place. Check out the links on the New Brunswick Anti-Tobacco Coalition website for information that can help you educated your landlord on this issue. There are also links to preventative measures you can take to help you limit the amount of second-hand smoke coming into your apartment or condo if your neighbours smokes or vapes:  http://nbatc.ca/en/index.php?page=multi-unit-dwellings.

 

Does my outdoor event need to be smoke-free?
How can I organize a smoke-free event outdoors?

There is a growing trend across the country towards smoke-free outdoor spaces. Many towns and cities in New Brunswick such as St. Stephen, Sussex, Dieppe, Moncton, Quispamsis, Bathurst, and Hampton have taken action by developing policies to protect their citizens from outdoor second-hand smoke. Support is also building across New Brunswick for smoke-free outdoor events.

As of July 1, 2015, the Smoke-Free Places Act bans smoking and vaping (tobacco, cannabis, as well as any substance that produces smoke and second-hand smoke) in many public outdoor settings. At a minimum, your outdoor event must comply with the smoke-free spaces designated under the Smoke-Free Places Act. These include:

  • On patios where food and/or alcohol is served and within 3m from the patio boundary;
  • 9m from doorways, windows and air intakes of buildings that are for public use;
  • In outdoor playgrounds and within 20m of their perimeters (examples include outdoor slides, swings, climbing structures, splash pads, wading pools, sandboxes);
  • On outdoor sports and recreational areas and within 20m of their perimeters (examples include outdoor tennis courts, baseball fields, soccer fields, swimming pools, beaches, skateboard parks, skating rinks, etc., and their spectator stands);
  • On a public walking trail and within 9m of the trail;
  • In provincial parks (except in designated smoking areas and on an occupied campsite); and
  • On the grounds of regional health authorities (hospitals, health clinics, etc.

Peace officers and inspectors are able to issue tickets to individuals who smoke or vape in public places where smoking and vaping are banned. A toll-free number is provided to report violations of the Smoke-free Places Act and to obtain additional information on this legislation: 1-866-234-4234.

Even if the Smoke-Free Places Act does not apply to the area where your event will be held, you, as an event organizer, can choose to make your event smoke-free. The New Brunswick Anti-Tobacco Coalition has many great tips and resources for you to do so included in its “Making My Outdoor Event Smoke-Free“ toolkit: http://nbatc.ca/en/index.php?page=making-my-event-smoke-free

 

How do I stop people from smoking and vaping during my outdoor event?

If you choose to make your outdoor event smoke-free, make sure to advertise and promote it as smoke-free so people know in advance as well as they arrive on site.

Peace officers and inspectors are able to issue tickets to individuals who smoke or vape in public places where smoking and vaping are banned, most smoke-free events are self-enforced and self-policed and do not require law enforcement or security. Tell your volunteers, employees, and the public that if they see someone smoking or vaping, they should inform them that the event is smoke-free and point them to where smoking and vaping are permitted. Give your volunteers advice on how to deal with the issue.

While this can be difficult for those who haven’t done it, most people are very receptive to this message. It’s as simple as saying:

Hi there. Thanks for coming today. I wanted to let you know that this event is smoke-free.

Please don’t smoke or vape while in X area.

Should you feel that you need to smoke or vape, please go to X area. Thank you for your co-operation.

A toll-free number is provided to report violations of the Smoke-free Places Act and to obtain additional information on this legislation:1-866-234-4234.

 

I thought electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) were useful in quitting smoking?

E-cigarettes are a hot topic in Canada, with strong voices arguing both for and against.

While e-cigarettes are marketed as a quit-smoking aid, they are not yet approved nor regulated for this use in Canada. There are also potential health risks to the use of electronic cigarettes. For example, the inhalation of propylene glycol is a known irritant.

If you are looking to quit smoking, there are many cessation aids that you can choose which have been proven safe and effective, such as nicotine patches, gum, inhalers, and lozenges. You can also contact the Smokers' Helpline for more a personalized quit plan, tips and strategies. 

Please note that as of July 1, 2015, it is also prohibited to use e-cigarettes and all vaping products in New Brunswick in areas where smoking is not permitted under the Smoke-Free Places Act.

More facts on e-cigarettes can be found here.

 

Where can I get more information on the rules and regulations I must follow as a tobacco retailer?

As a tobacco retail operator, you must understand that there are laws against selling tobacco and all associated products to minors and you must familiarize yourself and your staff with the rules and regulations of tobacco control. The Tobacco Retailers Guide provides information with respect to retailers under the Tobacco Tax Act.

 

I have concerns related to cannabis use and/or the dangers of second-hand cannabis smoke. Where can I get information on this topic?

The New Brunswick Anti-Tobacco Coalition focusses its effort on promoting tobacco-free living through public education, tobacco control and support for smoking cessation. However, there is a strong association between cannabis and tobacco use. Links to resources on this topic as well as the various pieces of legislation regarding cannabis use in Canada are available here


Where can I report someone smoking or vaping cannabis in a public place?

Smoking and/or vaping cannabis in public places that are designated as smoke-free by the Smoke-free Places Act can be reported to the Smoke-free Places Act Information Line. The Smoke-free Places Act Information Line toll-free number is 1-866-234-4234.
 
For all other complaints concerning cannabis, such as smoking it in a public place that is not already designated as smoke-free, or illegal sale or possession of cannabis, you should contact your local police detachment. 
 
More information here.